Featured Articles

AMD SVP John Byrne named turnaround exec of the year

AMD SVP John Byrne named turnaround exec of the year

Director of AMD’s PR Chris Hook has tweeted and confirmed later in a conversation with Fudzilla that John Byrne, Senior Vice…

More...
Shield Tablet 8 launching on Tuesday July 22nd

Shield Tablet 8 launching on Tuesday July 22nd

We knew the date for a while but as of right now we can confirm that Nvidia’s new Shield Tablet 8,…

More...
AMD confirms 20nm in 2015

AMD confirms 20nm in 2015

Lisa Su, Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, AMD, has confirmed what we told you back in May 2014 – …

More...
AMD reports loss, shares tumble

AMD reports loss, shares tumble

AMD’s debt load is causing huge problems for the chipmaker -- this quarter it had another substantial loss. The tame Apple Press…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 17 June 2011 10:33

Apple bans fanboys from filming live events

Written by Nick Farell
apple

You can't have fun without our say so
Jobs' Mob has decided that it will limit its fanboys from filming live concert or sporting events on their iPhones.

Apparently Apple is spending a fortune developing software that will sense when a smartphone user is trying to record a live event, and then switch off the device's camera. All an organiser has to do is install infrared devices and it will tell the iPhone to shut down its camera function, preventing any footage from being recorded.

The technology has appared in a patent application 18 months ago in California. The tame Apple press has gone all moist at the prospect of their freedom being limited. One reported that such a development “would be welcomed with open arms by many concertgoers, fed up with their view being blocked by a sea of glowing mobile phone screens”.

However Apple is developing the technology to placate broadcasters upset that members of the public are posting footage of events on websites. Our guess is that they will still see the glowing mobile phone screens, they will just be Android or another outfit, which does not get off in telling its users what to do.

In other moves, Apple has been awarded a patent to stop users from ‘sexting’, or sending inappropriate message on their phones. The censorship application aims to ensure those who use it are not able to send anything that uses suggestive or potentially incriminating words. Apple thinks that it could be used by parents who want to monitor what their children are texting and prevent them using the sort of language they use on the street anyway.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments