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Tuesday, 14 June 2011 09:22

Euro hackers take on the US

Written by Nick Farell
hackers

War of Independence
A few weeks after the US announced that hacking its servers could be seen as a declaration of war, a European group of hackers took out the US Senate computer server.

LulzSec, a hacker activist group made up of former members of the hacker organization Anonymous, said it had also broken into the networks of Bethesda Softworks and released sign-ons and passwords of users of a pornography website.

The hack follows more than two weeks of cyber attacks by the group, which claims  PBS, the television network Fox, and the Atlanta chapter of a U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation affiliate called InfraGuard for its scalps. On their webpage the hackers said that they didn't like the U.S. government very much.

Martina Bradford, deputy sergeant-at-arms of the U.S. Senate, said the hackers did not gain access into the Senate computer network and was only able to read and determine the directory structure of the file placed on senate.gov.  However the Senate data, known as a configuration file, could be used by other hackers to exploit vulnerabilities in the Senate network and obtain confidential information from U.S. Lawmakers.


Nick Farell

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