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Friday, 10 June 2011 12:23

IronKey for governments to pull finger on Cyber-Crime

Written by Nick Farell
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Insecurity experts need to do a better job too
Insecurity outfit Ironkey said that IT security professionals and governments need to do more to stop the rapidly increasing cyber-crime attacks.

It attacked last week's Global Cyber-Crime Summit in London, where leading firms failed to deliver concrete solutions to current threats. Art Wong, CEO of IronKey said that all eyes turned to the IT security industry global summit in the hope that the market experts would introduce new preventative methods to tackle threats head on, in a proactive manner.

He said that industry leaders took a reactive stance, focusing instead on dealing with existing threats, protecting end-points on the network and educating users. He added that the world needed a new direction for protecting data itself, moving away from failed methods like anti-virus that only detect threats after they occur.

While the summit did mention the need to educate users, Wong said that organisations can no longer expect their employees or customers to be responsible for IT security on their computing devices. Wong added: “It’s time for businesses, the industry and governments to take action, preventing threats and therefore protecting both themselves and their customer base.”


Nick Farell

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