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Monday, 16 May 2011 09:09

Chief River 2012 platform has fast flash standby

Written by Fuad Abazovic
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Resumes like standby, consumes like Hibernate
Intel will try to convince more consumers to hop aboard the SSD train in 2012, especially if it's part of 2012 Chief River, Ivy Bridge 22nm based notebook platform.

This new technology is rather easy to understand as it acts as an improvement to the existing standby technology. Of course, the system has to have a new Core processor of Ivy Bridge order, Panther Point PCH chipset, Windows 7, SSD drive and BIOS that will enable it. The technology allows user to put his machine in standby mode, after which the configured amount of time data moves from DRAM to non-volatile memory, in this case the SSD.

When a user turns on the PC, information goes back from SSD to DRAM and system resume time is the same as from traditional Standby. The second and the biggest benefit is that despite the fact that it resumes like standby, it consumes like Hibernate.

Of course this will only work with Chief River compatible notebooks that are coming at some point in 1H 2012, but it looks like a nice feature that will keep your system locked and loaded at all times. It means waking up much faster than from hibernate and all the applications will be ready, just the way they were when you got your system to standby, and all that in just a few seconds.


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