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Friday, 13 May 2011 10:01

Blighty cops buy Geotime

Written by Nick Farell


And a whole load of controversy
UK coppers have bought themselves a ton of controversy after splashing out on a security programme which tracks suspects' movements and communications and displays them on a 3D graphic.

The Metropolitan Police has bought Geotime, which information gathered from social networking sites, GPS devices like the iPhone, mobile phones, financial transactions and IP network logs to build a detailed picture of an individual's movements. Apparently it is thinking of using it to investigate public order disturbances and Daniel Hamilton, director of privacy campaign group Big Brother Watch, said he was concerned about the use of such invasive software for everyday police work.

What spooks many is that Geotime is not just going to be used to track people's behaviour, but also to predict people's behaviour - and it's a very thin line between policing public protest and preventing public protest.

Nick Farell

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