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Thursday, 12 May 2011 12:42

Facebook trash talks Symantec

Written by Nick Farell
facebook

You are talking rubbish
Symantec is talking rubbish when it claimed that a flaw on Facebook was giving personal data to advertisers. Symantec claimed that keys which would have given advertisers access to Facebook accounts were being accidentally shipped to them.

The insecurity outfit admitted that the advertisers probably did not know that Facebook had given them such powers. However Facebook trashed the comment saying that it appreciated Symantec raising this issue and that they worked with them to address it immediately.

But the whole thing was pretty silly. The keys expired after two hours and no private information could have been passed to third parties. Facebook added that there were contractual obligations of advertisers and developers, which prohibit them from obtaining or sharing user information in a way that violates Facebook policies.

Facebook denied there was any security scare and people should not be worried. However it has fixed that particular problem, just in case anyone was spooked.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Comments  

 
+13 #1 Exodite 2011-05-12 13:28
Quote:
...which prohibit them from obtaining or sharing user information in a way that violates Facebook policies.



How limiting are those policies, exactly?
 
 
+15 #2 dimz 2011-05-12 15:06
Quoting Exodite:
Quote:
...which prohibit them from obtaining or sharing user information in a way that violates Facebook policies.



How limiting are those policies, exactly?

I'd guess something along the lines of "stop only if you're discovered" lol
 
 
-6 #3 eugen 2011-05-12 16:09
anyone knows if fudzilla is owned or run`ed by google or yahoo,facebook? or it isn`t ..after closing my account on facebook a flood of spam messages invaded one of my email account`s thank god with address filtering ..
 
 
+3 #4 dicobalt 2011-05-12 16:55
Who cares they are both a load of crap.
 
 
+2 #5 eugen 2011-05-12 17:16
i kinda like the news feeds on fudzilla and it has my buddy for some yrs now..
 
 
-4 #6 SlickR 2011-05-13 00:17
No facebook doesn't sell personal information for hundreds of millions of dollars and that isn't why facebook is so expensive, no its expensive because they can place ads that almost 80% don't see because of adblock.
 

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