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Thursday, 12 May 2011 09:04

Microsoft stops spying in Windows Phone 7

Written by Nick Farell


Not that it ever did
Software giant Microsoft has changed its software on Windows Phone 7 handsets so that it strips identifiers from location software.

Although Redmond insists it never used the data to track users movements, cynics of things Microsoft might say “yeah right”. Writing in his bog. Windows Phone chief Andy Lees said the data Microsoft collected from the smartphones was for identifying local "landmarks" such as Wi-Fi access points and mobile base stations.

However he said that Microsoft had recently taken specific steps to eliminate the use and storage of unique device identifiers by our location service when collecting information about these landmarks.

He said that without a unique identifier or some other significant change to Microsoft's operating system or practices, it would be impossible for Microsoft to track an individual device.
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Comments  

 
+4 #1 Exodite 2011-05-12 12:45
Well, it worked for Apple. :)
 
 
+4 #2 SlickR 2011-05-13 00:37
And this is actually ordered by the US Government with the telecommunicati on act of 1996.

The companies here don't even have a say they are obligated by law to listen to the government and spy on people.
 

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