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Wednesday, 11 May 2011 14:24

Intel switching to PowerVR for next gen Atom

Written by Slobodan Simic
intel_insidenew_logo

PowerVR SGX545 graphics core

According to the slide posted over at VR-Zone.com, Intel will switch to PowerVR's SGX545 GPU in its upcoming Cedarview Atom CPU platform.

Of course, the new GPU path that Intel is taking with the upcoming Cedar Trail Atom doesn't bring anything new as, after all, the famous GMA 500 And GMA 600 were actually based on PowerVR's SGX535 graphics core. The good side of the story is that there will probably a significant boost in GPU performance, on paper at least. The new GPU will be clocked at 640MHz for the destop part and at 400MHz for the mobile one. These clocks are significantly faster than the original 200MHz clock that PowerVR used for this GPU.

The "new GPU" brings support for DirectX 10.1 and OpenGL 3.1 and hardware accelerated video decoding for MPEG-2, MPEG-4 part 2, VC1, WMV9 and H.264. Other noted specs on the slide include a single channel 24-bit LVDS display outputs with a resolution of up to 1440x900 coupled with eDP 1.1 as well as support for external D-Sub, HDMI 1.3a and Displayport 1.1. The memory is still limited to single channel but Intel upped maximum capacity to 4GB and threw in support for DDR3 1067MHz memory.

You can find the original slide and more info here.


Last modified on Wednesday, 11 May 2011 16:22
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