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Tuesday, 01 March 2011 10:21

Intel about to miss the boat on EUV

Written by Nick Farell
intel_logo_new

Delays drag on
An important milestone in the development of Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is in danger of missed by Intel.

Under its current roadmap Chipzilla needed to extend 193-nm immersion lithography to the 14-nm logic node in the second half of 2013. Then, the chip giant hopes to insert EUV for production at the 10-nm logic node, which is expected to appear in the second half of 2015.

According to EE Times EUV is late for the 10-nm design rule definition’’ stage. Quoting Sam Sivakumar, director of lithography at Intel, EUV still stands a good chance of being inserted for the company’s 10-nm node if production-worthy tools are shipped by the second half of 2012. But even then EUV will be at the ''late end of the spectrum.”

EUV is a next-generation lithography (NGL) technology that was supposed to be used for production at the 65-nm node. It was delayed, due to the lack of power sources, defect free masks, resists and metrology infrastructure.
Chip makers want the technology for production fabs, in an effort to avoid double-patterning techniques which are somewhat expensive.

EUV is now only likely to be seen at when production technology hits 16-nm node.


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+3 #1 Bl0bb3r 2011-03-01 13:00
Well, did they fix those mask problems or not? "still stands a good chance" tells me "not yet but we might". Even if double patterning is more expensive, an unworkable and expensive NGL isn't desired either.
 

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