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Monday, 21 February 2011 11:02

High End Sandy Bridge E in at least three SKUs

Written by Fuad Abazovic


All in Q4 2011
We have mentioned the socket LGA2011 and that the recently launched Core i7 990X will be replaced by Sandy Bridge E high end CPUs.

This won’t be the only CPU to get replaced in Q4 2011. The Core i7 990X is the last stop for Intel’s six-core Gulftown architecture and Sandy Bridge E definitely sounds 32nm to us. Core i7 970 also gets replaced with a Sandy Bridge E but we don’t know any specifics or the exact spec.

The recently introduced Core i7 2600K unlocked Sandy Bridge Socket 1155 will also be replaced by a similar iteration of Sandy Bridge E 2011.

This happens before Q4 2011, the alleged launch timeframe for Ivy Bridge, but we also know the new 22nm part won’t get to the real high end. The overclocking high-end market remains reserved for socket LGA2011 parts.
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Comments  

 
+11 #1 Harry Lloyd 2011-02-21 12:50
Cool, but we've known this for months now.

It also seems weird that when high-end gets 32 nm Sandy Bridge, mainstream will get 22 nm Ivy Bridge.
In my opinion they should release everything at the same time. Splitting the platforms created a mess - we have three architectures on sale at the moment - Nehalem, Westmere, and Sandy Bridge.
 
 
+5 #2 BernardP 2011-02-21 13:12
The recently introduced Core i7 2600K unlocked Sandy Bridge Socket 1155 will also be replaced by a similar iteration of Sandy Bridge E 2011.

First time I read about this. Does it mean that all hyperthreading processors will be part of the E line?
 
 
+4 #3 deadspeedv 2011-02-21 13:12
Quoting Harry Lloyd:
Cool, but we've known this for months now.

It also seems weird that when high-end gets 32 nm Sandy Bridge, mainstream will get 22 nm Ivy Bridge.
In my opinion they should release everything at the same time. Splitting the platforms created a mess - we have three architectures on sale at the moment - Nehalem, Westmere, and Sandy Bridge.


Nehalem and westmere are the same architecture. Just different size. Nehalem was released in late 2008. So it has been awhile
 
 
+4 #4 milkod2001 2011-02-21 13:37
so for the mainstream: Ivy Bridge 22nm CPUs will replace Sandy Bridge 32mn CPUs still using 1155 socket and for High End there are Sandy Bridge E CPUs with new socket 2011. Is that right? What about Z68 chipset. Will it support Ivy Bridge 22nm CPUs?
 
 
-7 #5 genetix 2011-02-21 13:57
As far I can see Intel is just playing. Why would an 4c SB come so much earlier, if it wouldn't just be to kick start the low end hardware to market as they know that triple/'true'quad channel memory is so much more even while latencies would be dropped.

Also, cores were ready look at XEON line up no way in hell that Q4/2011 will match to anything hell this line-up will be out in 'real' at March, if we look little harder.

http://www.cpu-world.com/news_2011/2011020901_Intel_Xeon_E7-8800_specifications.html
 
 
-2 #6 Harry Lloyd 2011-02-21 14:22
Quoting deadspeedv:
Nehalem and westmere are the same architecture. Just different size. Nehalem was released in late 2008. So it has been awhile

If you want to be that specific, then we've had a single architecture since 2006, because these are all based on Core (nevermind that this is based on Pentium III).

Westmere isn't just a shrink (Intel never does that). It has some changes, for example AVX instructions.

What I meant was that when 65 nm Core 2 came out, old NetBurst CPUs were phased out in time. By the time 45 nm Core 2 came out, there wasn't a single NetBurst CPU on sale, and 65 nm equivalent Core 2 CPUs were gone as well.
 
 
+6 #7 Harry Lloyd 2011-02-21 14:23
Splitting the platforms resulted in Bloomfield being alive for over two years now, when it shoud've been replaced by Westmere quad-core CPUs a long time ago.

And there's still nearly a year of life left in Bloomfield, which is really outdated now compared to Sandy Bridge.
 
 
+5 #8 Tasty Taste 2011-02-21 15:08
Quoting Harry Lloyd:
Splitting the platforms resulted in Bloomfield being alive for over two years now, when it shoud've been replaced by Westmere quad-core CPUs a long time ago.

And there's still nearly a year of life left in Bloomfield, which is really outdated now compared to Sandy Bridge.


i7 950 still running strong..
 
 
+5 #9 TechHog 2011-02-21 15:29
Quoting Harry Lloyd:
If you want to be that specific, then we've had a single architecture since 2006, because these are all based on Core (nevermind that this is based on Pentium III)

That's not true at all. The branding has nothing to do with the ar Core 2 and only Core 2 uses the Core architecture. Nehalem and Sandy Bridge are completely separate (unless you go really deep, in which case you might as well just look at them as x86). Meanwhile, Westmere is directly based on Nahalem and is really just a die shrink with some added features, which is why it doesn't perform any better than Nahalem clock-for-clock.
 
 
0 #10 Harry Lloyd 2011-02-21 18:40
What are you talking about? It's the same architecture, with minor and major changes every year.

Just like AMD is using K8 since 2004. They're adding new instructions, optimizations, new features, and they move to a new process, but it's still the same architecture (with new codenames - K10, K10.5). Bulldozer is a completely new architecture, designed from the ground up.

Ivy Bridge is rumored to be the last Core iteration, and Haswell is supposed to be a completely new architecture, but it's just speculation at this point.
 

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