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Wednesday, 16 February 2011 12:54

Police chief advocates Facebook hacking

Written by

Keyloggers keep kids out of trouble
A New Jersey police chief is telling parents they should try to hack their kids' Facebook profiles and frankly he makes a rather interesting point.

Mahwah Police Chief James Batelli says teens are locking their parents out of their virtual lives and that parents simply don't understand the risks and tend to shake off concerns in their naivety. In police seminars, Batelli's detectives teach parents how to install keylogging software and monitor their offspring's online activities.

"To stick your head in the sand and think that, in 9th, 10th, 8th grade, your child is not going to be exposed to alcohol, is not going to be exposed to drugs is kind of a naive way to go about it," he said.

Batelli warns that inappropriate photos or posts on Facebook threaten to ruin young people's career and college choices in the long run. He is not alone in such claims, as several researchers have made similar dire warnings in the past. Although keylogging and eavesdropping will be a step too far for many parents, it's a pretty good idea to bring up this particular subject next time you have a serious talk with your kids.

Losing a chance to get proper education or a good job over silly Facebook photos or comments is a possibility in this day and age. Somewhere down the road, your kids might thank you for making them delete their daft ramblings and obscene photos, especially if some of their friends end up flipping burgers for the rest of their days thanks to their online activities.

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Comments  

 
+14 #1 Kryojenix 2011-02-16 13:04
Burgerfliponomi cs is a serious vocation!
 
 
-3 #2 nt300 2011-02-16 19:26
How about if we all hack into that police chief's PC, home etc., and monitor him? How would be like that? People have a right to a personal life along with the Freedoms that come with it. That Police Chief along with others that think like him need a nice bitch slap up-side-the-head...
 
 
+3 #3 TechHog 2011-02-16 21:10
Oh dear god. What's wrong with just, you know, the parent just joining FaceBook and asking the kid to add them as a friend? If the kid says no, then there are clearly other issues that the parent and child need to work on, and keylogging will not solve the underlying issue here. And parents complain about their kids not communicating with them enough. Stop driving your kids away, parents!
 
 
+2 #4 123s 2011-02-16 21:19
Adding them over FB is pretty much stalking too. Its they job to warn enough before giving kids internet access at all.
 
 
0 #5 TechHog 2011-02-16 21:39
Quoting 123s:
Adding them over FB is pretty much stalking too. Its they job to warn enough before giving kids internet access at all.

Well, at least that way the kid knows about it. Parents are concerned about their kids' safety. If the kid and the parent are on good terms, they'll work something out in this regard. However, if the kid gets angry and flat-out refuses while the parent keeps insisting and they can't reach some type of common ground, then something is seriously wrong. The kid should understand the parent's concern, and the parent should respect the kid's privacy. I guess I wasn't specific enough about that, though. My bad.
 
 
0 #6 123s 2011-02-16 21:51
The line between concern and stalking is pretty thin and some parents end up on the other side and dont even realize how they ignore their kids privacy and i dont think that a kids will understand a parents concern fully, they´re still kids and dont think about that much. Its about age range too ofc.

Anyway, i agree, something went pretty wrong if they cant agree on something like that and the problem is much bigger then FB.
 
 
-1 #7 TechHog 2011-02-16 22:33
Quoting 123s:
The line between concern and stalking is pretty thin and some parents end up on the other side and dont even realize how they ignore their kids privacy and i dont think that a kids will understand a parents concern fully, they´re still kids and dont think about that much. Its about age range too ofc.

Anyway, i agree, something went pretty wrong if they cant agree on something like that and the problem is much bigger then FB.

I was mostly thinking about teenagers, since they're more likely to be using FB and younger kids are typically not too concerned about privacy in the first place.
 
 
-1 #8 123s 2011-02-16 23:02
The kids i know are, not sure if you can count them as teenager with 12-13 but i know a 19y old guy who was spyed by his father on FB too >.<
 
 
+1 #9 TechHog 2011-02-16 23:29
I think that kids start wanting privacy around 10.

And that 19 year-old and his father probably fall into the "issues beyond FB" category.

Though, I guess I may be biased because my mom respects my privacy fully, and as a result I share with her a lot of the time.
 
 
0 #10 trae32566 2011-02-17 00:52
It's asinine that anyone thinks they should hack a kid's account, and I'm pretty sure if you did it to the wrong person, they'd probably do something much worse back. I don't think he realizes how easy it is to retaliate. Pretty sure a nice denial of service would shut him up for quite awhile. Oh, cool fact, a lot of botnet controllers are very, very young.
 

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