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Wednesday, 16 February 2011 12:54

Police chief advocates Facebook hacking

Written by

Keyloggers keep kids out of trouble
A New Jersey police chief is telling parents they should try to hack their kids' Facebook profiles and frankly he makes a rather interesting point.

Mahwah Police Chief James Batelli says teens are locking their parents out of their virtual lives and that parents simply don't understand the risks and tend to shake off concerns in their naivety. In police seminars, Batelli's detectives teach parents how to install keylogging software and monitor their offspring's online activities.

"To stick your head in the sand and think that, in 9th, 10th, 8th grade, your child is not going to be exposed to alcohol, is not going to be exposed to drugs is kind of a naive way to go about it," he said.

Batelli warns that inappropriate photos or posts on Facebook threaten to ruin young people's career and college choices in the long run. He is not alone in such claims, as several researchers have made similar dire warnings in the past. Although keylogging and eavesdropping will be a step too far for many parents, it's a pretty good idea to bring up this particular subject next time you have a serious talk with your kids.

Losing a chance to get proper education or a good job over silly Facebook photos or comments is a possibility in this day and age. Somewhere down the road, your kids might thank you for making them delete their daft ramblings and obscene photos, especially if some of their friends end up flipping burgers for the rest of their days thanks to their online activities.

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