Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD is fast tracking stacked DRAM deployment and a new presentation leaked by the company  points to APUs with stacked DRAM,…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 16 February 2011 12:54

Police chief advocates Facebook hacking

Written by

Keyloggers keep kids out of trouble
A New Jersey police chief is telling parents they should try to hack their kids' Facebook profiles and frankly he makes a rather interesting point.

Mahwah Police Chief James Batelli says teens are locking their parents out of their virtual lives and that parents simply don't understand the risks and tend to shake off concerns in their naivety. In police seminars, Batelli's detectives teach parents how to install keylogging software and monitor their offspring's online activities.

"To stick your head in the sand and think that, in 9th, 10th, 8th grade, your child is not going to be exposed to alcohol, is not going to be exposed to drugs is kind of a naive way to go about it," he said.

Batelli warns that inappropriate photos or posts on Facebook threaten to ruin young people's career and college choices in the long run. He is not alone in such claims, as several researchers have made similar dire warnings in the past. Although keylogging and eavesdropping will be a step too far for many parents, it's a pretty good idea to bring up this particular subject next time you have a serious talk with your kids.

Losing a chance to get proper education or a good job over silly Facebook photos or comments is a possibility in this day and age. Somewhere down the road, your kids might thank you for making them delete their daft ramblings and obscene photos, especially if some of their friends end up flipping burgers for the rest of their days thanks to their online activities.

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments