Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

HP Stream is a Chromebook killer priced at $200

HP Stream is a Chromebook killer priced at $200

We have been hearing reports of a new breed of affordable Windows notebooks for months. It is alleged that a number…

More...
AMD Radeon R7 SSD line-up goes official

AMD Radeon R7 SSD line-up goes official

AMD has officially launched its first ever SSDs and all three are part of AMD’s AMD Radeon R7 SSD series.

More...
KitKat has more than a fifth of Android users

KitKat has more than a fifth of Android users

Android 4.4 is now running on more than a fifth of Android devices, according to Google’s latest figures.

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 29 January 2008 10:04

Open Source installed in the Philippines

Written by

Image

After overcoming suspicion


One of the biggest problems installing Linux in schools in the Philippines was not Microsoft, but suspicions that government officials had about free software.

Independent open source consultant, Ricardo Gonzalez, said when he set up a huge open source project for schools he wanted to use Fedora 5. However, it had to go all the way to office of the Filipino President before a decision was made. The President's office kept passing it around because it was worried about why anyone would offer something for free and who would support and teach it.

The project dragged on for four to five months to a point where Microsoft matched the price by offering Windows XP for $US20 a copy and even threw in Office for $US30. Even then, the project was cheaper, so Microsoft offered free training to high school teachers.

However after "jumping through all the hoops", including having the Department of Science and Technology evaluate the Linux solution for its usefulness, ASI got the contract and all 10,000 computers were delivered at the end of December, 2007. The savings meant that the project could get an additional 3,000 PCs and now another 300 schools have Linux networks.

More here.
Last modified on Wednesday, 30 January 2008 03:27

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments