Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 18 January 2011 18:55

Micro-server specification out

Written by Nick Farell


Power-efficient ready for entry-level web-hosting
A server industry group led by Intel has released a spec for a Micro Module Server.

According to Search Data Centre, The Server System Infrastructure (SSI) Forum, is a special interest group serving the x86 server industry. If people start following the spec then it could mean that  micro servers could be right around the corner. Micro Module Servers could be the things that kill off blade servers. Blades are dense and provide good performance, but they also consume a lot of power. But Micro Modules are both dense and save a lot of electricity.

Micro servers will ship in a fully populated chassis that provides a shared power supply and fan like a blade chassis. But to keep the cost down, micro server chassis will probably not include any integrated switching or management. Work on the specification was spearheaded by Intel, Quanta Computer Inc. and x86 server motherboard maker Tyan.

The performance offered by micro servers will be determined by the processors vendors put in them, which the SSI Forum spec does not prescribe. Currently the thinking is something like single-socket Xeons based on the E3 series. Later there will be micro servers based on Intel Atoms chips, and potentially ARM processors. The SSI specification also leaves vendors open to stack their micro servers horizontally or vertically.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+6 #1 loadwick 2011-01-18 19:41
After much investigation the Server System Infrastructure (SSI) Forum came to the conclusion that the best processor for a Micro Module Server would be an ARM cpu!!
 
 
+2 #2 Bl0bb3r 2011-01-18 20:03
Yes, ARM does meet the requirement for low power, but see the thing that doesn't add up: "provide good performance". Blades don't draw power to heat up the server racks...
 
 
0 #3 muppet show 2011-01-19 00:57
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
Yes, ARM does meet the requirement for low power, but see the thing that doesn't add up: "provide good performance". Blades don't draw power to heat up the server racks...


They have vastly more performance per watt and even more importantly performance per €/£/$ than any x86 processor. I'd expect a dual core A9 @ 1Ghz @ 45nm to best anything that Intel will be able to do @ 22nm in terms of either of the 2 above indicators by a very, very wide margin. It'll only get worse for Intel as the dedicated server chips and other products are released (eventually on processes smaller than 45nm).

ARM particularly and RISC in general scales up very well.
x86 does not scale down at all.

End of story.
 
 
+1 #4 loadwick 2011-01-19 03:26
I don't think it will be the end just yet.

At the moment, Intel are far behind ARM in the mobile world but i wouldn't underestimate how much programers don't like change. If the program is already written in x86 then you will find most people can't be bothered to re-write it all over again for ARM. Just look how long it took MS with Windows.

This is what will give Intel the time to catch up and probably over take. People don't like hearing it and i truly hope ARM can genuinely challenge Intel but i think Intel will pull itself together and x86 is just easier for the lazy programmers!
 
 
0 #5 loadwick 2011-01-19 03:49
But Intel will be behind for the next few years. Just as Intel is rolling out its 22nm process the ARM world will have 28nm. I don't think Intel will be anywhere near ARM at this stage as the specs going around for chips made at 28nm are looking sweet!

But like i said, Intel haven't got to where they are today without a few hurdles. A combination of smaller die sizes, owning own fabs, x86 and MIC means Intel isn't out just yet.
 
 
+1 #6 Bl0bb3r 2011-01-19 07:55
Quoting muppet show:
x86 does not scale down at all.

End of story.





Well, see, here is where you're not factoring in advancements of on-die SIMD like AMD is doing right now. Granted, the x86 core alone can't be scaled down, but the GPGPU besides it can. Based on the NI architecture, things are looking quite different at least for AMD... basically the GPU shaders can be split and each group can take its own thread to process. GPU Compute section, http://semiaccurate.com/2010/12/14/look-amds-new-cayman6900-architecture/

I agree with loadwick, programmers don't really want to swap development environments just because something "might" look better.
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments