Featured Articles

AMD SVP John Byrne named turnaround exec of the year

AMD SVP John Byrne named turnaround exec of the year

Director of AMD’s PR Chris Hook has tweeted and confirmed later in a conversation with Fudzilla that John Byrne, Senior Vice…

More...
Shield Tablet 8 launching on Tuesday July 22nd

Shield Tablet 8 launching on Tuesday July 22nd

We knew the date for a while but as of right now we can confirm that Nvidia’s new Shield Tablet 8,…

More...
AMD confirms 20nm in 2015

AMD confirms 20nm in 2015

Lisa Su, Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, AMD, has confirmed what we told you back in May 2014 – …

More...
AMD reports loss, shares tumble

AMD reports loss, shares tumble

AMD’s debt load is causing huge problems for the chipmaker -- this quarter it had another substantial loss. The tame Apple Press…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 17 January 2011 11:45

Fruitfly provides key to distributed computing

Written by Nick Farell
y_exclamation

Short-lived fast breeders
The Fruitfly is teaching boffins a thing or two about distributed computing. The boffins at Carniegie-Mellon University and Tel Aviv University have used the fruitfly to create new, performance-improving algorithms.

Your average fruitfly has a central nervous system like a distributed computing and wireless sensor networks. A certain number of cells take on leadership roles, handing down commands to the rest of the cells. The differences between the computer networks and the fruit flies comes down to the method in which processors or cells become leaders.

With the fruit fly nervous system, cells will evolve into a leadership role and emit a chemical preventing the surrounding cells from doing the same thing. The boffins have worked out how to do something similar with computer networks to work out which computers would issue commands.

It makes distributed networks go like the clappers. That is until they get a sniff of citrus and start going crazy.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments