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Monday, 28 January 2008 06:30

SeeqPod under fire from Warner Bros.

Written by David Stellmack
Image

Claims search engine infringes copyright


In the latest round of intellectual property infringement lawsuits, SeeqPod has become a target for Warner Brothers Records. Although SeeqPod does not host any of the infringing files itself, Warner claims that by pointing users to where they can download files through its search engine technology, SeeqPod is infringing on the copyright of the intellectual property owners.

This is not the first time that a search engine has come under fire. Other search engines have come under fire from intellectual property owners under the argument that they are a conduit to assist users in violating copyrights.

The goal of these suits seems to be more directed toward protecting the studio’s revenues by shutting down easy avenues for users to access the material than anything else. A reduction in what is being termed as “casual piracy” is just another step in trying to turn the tide against those who are using the Internet to download copyrighted works.

Last modified on Monday, 28 January 2008 08:40

David Stellmack

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