Featured Articles

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia’s original Shield console launched last summer to mixed reviews. It went on sale in the US and so far Nvidia…

More...
AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

We had a chance to talk about AMD’s upcoming products with John Byrne, Chief Sales Officer, AMD. We covered a number…

More...
AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

We had a chance to talk to John Byrne who spent the last two years as Senior Vice President and Chief…

More...
OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OnePlus is one of the few small companies that might disrupt the Android phone market, dominated by giant outfits like Samsung.…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 28 January 2008 06:30

SeeqPod under fire from Warner Bros.

Written by David Stellmack
Image

Claims search engine infringes copyright


In the latest round of intellectual property infringement lawsuits, SeeqPod has become a target for Warner Brothers Records. Although SeeqPod does not host any of the infringing files itself, Warner claims that by pointing users to where they can download files through its search engine technology, SeeqPod is infringing on the copyright of the intellectual property owners.

This is not the first time that a search engine has come under fire. Other search engines have come under fire from intellectual property owners under the argument that they are a conduit to assist users in violating copyrights.

The goal of these suits seems to be more directed toward protecting the studio’s revenues by shutting down easy avenues for users to access the material than anything else. A reduction in what is being termed as “casual piracy” is just another step in trying to turn the tide against those who are using the Internet to download copyrighted works.

Last modified on Monday, 28 January 2008 08:40

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments