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Friday, 25 January 2008 12:46

Digg users protest new algorithm

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Image

Might have to be canned


Digg
users are up in arms over a new algorithm that would let a more diverse set of users determine which stories reach the top of its rankings.

A group of Digg users organized a temporary boycott of the site because they felt the new algorithm would leave "power users" stuck in the queue. Top users such as Andy Sorcini, David Cohn, Muhammad Saleem and Reg Saddler said that they planned to stop submitting to Digg. They are cross that the rules of the game have changed and there are rumours of things like secret editors and auto-bury policies at the site these days.

It is the latest revolt in the second collective move by Digg users in less than a year. In May, many of the site's users staged an "Internet riot" by continuously posting a software key for cracking the encryption technology used to limit the copying of HD-DVD and Blu-ray discs after Digg management had removed it.
Last modified on Saturday, 26 January 2008 06:05

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