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Thursday, 23 December 2010 10:36

CIA taskforce assess impact of Wikileaks cables

Written by


Has the worst acronym ever
The CIA has apparently launched a new taskforce to examine the impact of US diplomatic cables and other documents published by Wikileaks.

CIA has dubbed it Wikileaks Task Force, but the spooks in Langley simply call it WTF, which is one of the worst acronyms ever devised, but then again it is probably suitable considering the situation. Few of the leaked documents had anything to do with the CIA, most were embassy cables drafted by junior staffers who obviously never expected their rants and colorful epithets to be seen by the public.

However, despite the fact that it was largely unaffected by the mess, the CIA sees the publication as a grave threat to US security. The leaks have damaged confidence in the US diplomatic apparatus and its ability to keep secrets, so a potential source, defector or other asset might think twice before ringing up US officials to offer intelligence or other services.

Unlike other government agencies and services, the CIA has rejected requests to share more of its reports on SIPRNET, which clearly proved to be a prudent decision.

More here.

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