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Wednesday, 22 December 2010 13:25

Spanish dump “three strikes” law plans

Written by Nick Farell


Politicians refuse to give in to US pressure
Spanish politicians have decided to abandon a three strike law against file-sharers after Wikileaks revealed how much US pressure was being placed on the government to bring in the laws.

The Ley de Economia Sostenible (Sustainable Economy Act) contained a clause mandating ISPs to block websites suspected of facilitating copyright infringing activities. The clause has been dropped thanks to Wikileaks showing a cable where United States industry representatives threatened to put Spain on a priority watch-list if their demands were not met on the copyright front.

The pressure from the US may have backfired as the Spanish decided that giving into bullying was a bad idea. There are other controversial aspects of the law including mandating ISPs to divulge customer information without a court order among other things but the worst of it is probably over.

The Association of Internet Users dubbed the law as an “invasion” on Spanish democracy and direct and open attack on Spanish citizens by a foreign power.

Nick Farell

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