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Monday, 20 December 2010 09:21

EU unhappy about Intel's McAfee buy

Written by Nick Farell
euintel_logo_new

Wants to talk to rivals
It looks like Intel's strange purchase of the security outfit McAfee has raised the eyebrows of the European Union.

The EU has kept a close eye on Chipzilla since it fined the outfit $1.45 billion for anti-trust behavour. According to the Wall Street Journal which has been talking to deep throats within the Commission, a questionnaire is being circulated by European Union investigators over the buy out.

The EU’s antitrust regulator has privately expressed some apprehensions about the $7.68 billion acquisition during its preliminary assessment of the deal. If that is the case, the regulator will want a wide-ranging study of the implications of the McAfee acquisition. The EU has until January 12, 2011, to either issue a judgement on the deal or to initiate the more-extended review.

Apparently the antitrust watchdogs have been snuffling around the hindquarters of rival security-software companies asking their views. The concern is that Intel might give McAfee products exclusive or special access to some chip features; thereby enabling the products to run more effectively.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
-14 #1 Warhead 2010-12-20 09:44
I think the EU should be more concerned about saving its own economy than harrasing Intel.
 
 
+23 #2 Blazzin 2010-12-20 10:45
You have to admire the EU real tough on Anti trust. Intel brought this on themselves or have we forgotten what they did to AMD
 
 
+15 #3 Exodite 2010-12-20 11:35
Quoting Warhead:
I think the EU should be more concerned about saving its own economy than harrasing Intel.

There's really no such thing as 'EU economy' as the EU isn't the equivalent of the US.

That said the EU, overall, is doing better - financially - than most areas outside of China.

To steer this somewhat back on topic Intel is hardly being 'harassed', anti-trust probes is a fact of life for huge multi-national companies in general and Intel hasn't exactly inspired a lot of trust in the past.
 
 
+7 #4 Warhead 2010-12-20 13:10
Quote:
There's really no such thing as 'EU economy' as the EU isn't the equivalent of the US.



There is. It's called "Eurozone" which is not doing well right now. Just look at what's happening with Irland, Portugal other countries that are making major reforms in their countries (or asking for financial packages).
 
 
-2 #5 nECrO 2010-12-20 17:34
Quoting Warhead:
Quote:
There's really no such thing as 'EU economy' as the EU isn't the equivalent of the US.



There is. It's called "Eurozone" which is not doing well right now. Just look at what's happening with Irland, Portugal other countries that are making major reforms in their countries (or asking for financial packages).




And this has what to do with Intel's business practices? We are still trying to recover from our own financial woes here in the US. Suggesting that countries /governments not enforce their laws and protect citizens based on their economy just highlights your lack of education.

Or you could just be a troll looking for attention. Still, a wanker is a wanker.
 
 
-2 #6 Roseman 2010-12-21 07:37
I can't think of anything from the top of my head that would make a McAfee buy out by Intel Anti-Competitive. Unless, god forbid, they're trying to improve the anti-virus protection on their CPUs and MoBos in some way.

As for the economy, you're both pretty screwed for the next 30-50 years depending on how fast you're willing to pay off the debt. Who cares anyway? if capitalism is anything to go by it's good economic policy to keep it a level playing field.
 

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