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Wednesday, 15 December 2010 12:00

Gawker passwords revealed

Written by Nedim Hadzic
y_analyst

123456 and 12345678 hit top 10
The recent hacking of Gawker Media resulted in hackers publishing usernames and passwords. WSJ crunched some numbers and came up with an interesting analysis of most used passwords.

So, out of 188,279 stolen passwords, top ten used passwords were as follows:
  1. 123456
  2. password
  3. 12345678
  4. lifehack
  5. qwerty
  6. abc123
  7. 111111
  8. monkey
  9. consumer
  10. 12345

We’re really not very surprised at seeing “123456”, “12345678” and “qwerty” sitting in top spots, as most people tend to just be lazy when devising passwords. There’s also the risk of forgetting it so its’s best to use a simple one - we get that. What we really don’t get though is where does “monkey” fit in. (Damn, I've gotta change my password. sub.ed.)

WSJ’s analysis also shows that Gmail and Yahoo email users are more prone to using eight or more characters in their passwords than Microsoft users.

You can find the full analysis here.


Last modified on Wednesday, 15 December 2010 12:13

Nedim Hadzic

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Comments  

 
+2 #1 PainPig 2010-12-15 12:43
It' is one thing to DOS a site but then to reveal the usernames and passwords, that is going to far. I am all for freedoms of all kinds but this makes it a crime.
 
 
+3 #2 yourma2000 2010-12-15 13:16
should just do what I did and think of the most stupid and random thing to come to mind and use that as a password, I've done so for 6 years and not had one account hack so far
 
 
0 #3 0M3G4 2010-12-15 16:52
Quoting yourma2000:
should just do what I did and think of the most stupid and random thing to come to mind and use that as a password, I've done so for 6 years and not had one account hack so far


Alternatively, one could use a mix of numbers and letters! ;)
 
 
+1 #4 ghelyar 2010-12-15 18:45
No god, sex, secret or love?

What this list really doesn't show is that probably a far more popular password is whatever their user name is (joe accounts). For the first few weeks of my website, I didn't have a check for joe accounts and about 60% of the accounts made in that time used the same user name and password. In this list, they would come up as single use because of unique user names.
 
 
0 #5 Fud_u 2010-12-16 10:05
forgot to add "stupid" to the list?
 

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