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Wednesday, 01 December 2010 14:21

Wireless outfits big Linux supporters

Written by Nick Farell


Can't get enough penguin
Wireless companies are flogging to adopt Linux, according to a report from the Linux Foundation said.

The report shows the role of traditional top contributors to Linux, such as Red Hat, Novell and IBM, is slightly decreasing, while companies with a strong mobile Linux focus are becoming increasingly important for the development of the platform.

Most of the situation is thanks to Google's free Linux-based Android platform, which has pushed the operating system into the mobile world. Top smartphone makers, other than Nokia and Apple, use Android in their flagship phones. However Nokia is likely to push entirely into the Linux verson MeeGo next year.

Intel has passed Novell and IBM to become the second largest contributor to Linux, while Nokia has risen to the No. 5 spot. More than 70 percent of contributions are from developers who are getting paid for their Linux development from corporations who hope to benefit from better software in their core business, the report said.

Nick Farell

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