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Thursday, 26 May 2011 12:04

Choiix Power Fort 10Whrs and 5.5Whrs tested - Test

Written by Muamer Odobasic
3240_choiix_logo  mala

Review: Power on the go for your gadgets

If you’ve ever owned a phone, chances are you’ve experienced the infuriating feeling of a having a top notch, expensive device in your hands that’s as useful as a brick because of a drained battery. Thankfully, Choiix has an interesting solution that will bring our gadgets back to life regardless of where we are. 

Choiix is Cooler Master’s brand and we’ve recently received two batteries that can charge up various devices, such a phones, mp3 players, etc.

officiel1

officiel2

These two products are named Power Fort, with the differences being the physical size and capacities.


 

Choiix Power Fort 10 Whrs

Choiix Power Fort 10 Whrs comes in very simple packaging with two USB cables and many different adapters.

Mar227

Power Fort is, as you can see, quite a charmer and the device comes in more than handy.

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The top is made of shiny black plastics and holds a key and four status LEDs, which show the amount of power available.

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The bottom of the device is coated with rubber to prevent it from sliding out of your hand.

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If you think that the practical aspect of this device stops there, then you’ve got another thing coming. If you’re left in the dark, the three LEDs on the bottom can act as a flashlight.

PowerFort_B_03

 


Specs


- Slim curve design and light weight
- Special bypass circuit design prevents the battery from the damage
- Powerful 1A charges 30% faster than normal USB power
- Built-in LED flashlight for emergency
- Battery life LED indicators
- Up to 500 recharge times with 85% capacity remaining
- Quick recharge less than 3.5 hours
- Full protections built-in to avoid battery damage
- Ultra low self-discharge battery cell function

Pfort_W10_Spec
Features_w10-2




Power Fort 5,5 Whrs


Design-wise, the Power Fort 5,5 Whrs looks much like its sibling.

Together

Together_2

5,5 Whrs version of the Power Fort is much smaller and portable, otherwise it’s pretty much identical to the 10Whrs version.

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The only possible issue you may have with the design is that the shiny plastics is a fingerprint magnet.

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Unlike its bigger brother, the Power Fort 5,5 Whrs’ LED changes color from green to red, indicating the amount of power left. Green means 30-100 percent left whereas the red means power level is below 30 percent.

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Power Fort 5,5 Whrs has a rubber-like material to prevent slipping, although it also has some carved out channels for the same purpose.

backside_w5-5

Power Fort 5,5 Whrs packs less power and it doesn’t come with LED flashlight, which is the case with the 10Whrs version.

zajedno_LED

Specs

- Slim curve design and light weight
- Powerful 1A charges 2 times faster than normal USB power
- Battery life LED indicator
- Up to 300 recharge times with 85% capacity remaining
- Quick recharge less than 3 hours
- Safety protections built-in to avoid battery damage
- Ultra low self-discharge battery cell design

Pfort_W5-5_Spec

features_w5-5


 

Of course, benchmarks won’t help in testing these devices and we resorted to practical use. After all, all that matters is whether they do a good job and how quickly they do it.

We tested both devices in identical scenarios and compared the results. As you would expect, the first test was how quickly they get charged up. Both devices stayed true to their specs, although the 5,5Whrs charged up somewhat quicker, a bit less than 2 hours. The 10 Whrs version required slightly more than 3 hours.

Our main testing was with HTC Hero Smartphone, which has a 1350 mAh battery.

Power Fort 10 Whrs managed to fully charge the HTC Hero in 2 hours and 20 minutes, which is only 5 minutes less than we managed by charging the phone via a laptop. Fully charging the device via a wall outlet takes about 2 hours.

Power Fort 5,5 Whrs turned out to be a slower charger as it took 4 hours to charge up the HTC Hero. Just to make sure, we tried it two more times and received identical results.

We tested out the Power Fort devices with several other Smartphones, an MP3 player and Samsung’s camera. All these devices are powered via USB port so everything was set for Power Fort devices.

 


 

Conclusion

The age of Smartphones and various mobile gadgets makes the Power Fort line all the more practical, is it’s a real power on the go.

The 10Whrs version with 2700mAh capacity definitely earned our trust. The packaging has different plugs for different regions, car charger and LED flashlight. The only possible downside would be the size or the fact that it catches prints, but none of that takes away from the really practical side of the device. It currently goes for about €40.

The 5,5Whrs version is much smaller and much more practical to carry around. However, its performance is almost twice lower and slower than the 10Whrs one. We were pretty surprised by the performance, especially since specs claim otherwise. We repeated the test several times and received identical results, although there is a possibility that we’ve received a deficient sample. The device goes for €20.

In conclusion, both devices are nicely designed and practical and you’ll definitely learn to appreciate them when a battery on your phone/MP3/camera is dying with no electricity to be found.

(Page 4 of 5)
Last modified on Thursday, 26 May 2011 12:24
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