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Friday, 05 November 2010 10:34

3D could blow up in industry’s face

Written by Nick Farell


Hard to see mass market appeal
The rush to get 3D products out could blow up in the tech industry’s face.

According to PCR magazine the push into 3D is not really supported by evidence that it is wanted. The MD of Target Components Paul Cubbage said that it was difficult to see a mass-market application for 3D at this stage. He said that trying to convince the public that they have a need or desire for 3D TV will likely be an uphill struggle.

Adam Harris, CEO of trade body TCA added that the experience both at home and in the cinema doesn’t feel natural and, if you wear glasses it is also inconvenient. “There is no doubt that 3D, when used properly, can enhance the visual experience and gives some breathtaking results, but one of the issues is that there is too much bad use of the technology," he said, AMD's Neil Spicer admitted that the technology still has some maturing to do and that growth will largely depend on the experience for some.

He said that AMD thinks that the growth and mass-market appeal for 3D devices will depend upon the new experiences offered beyond the current glasses-and-monitor systems available.
Last modified on Friday, 05 November 2010 13:21

Nick Farell

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