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Friday, 29 October 2010 09:27

Google bans app for control freaks

Written by Nick Farell


Privacy breach
A mobile phone application which helps people monitor their partners' sms messages has been banned by Google.

The app secretly forwards texts so that control freak partners can find out what their lover is doing. Google has decided that the software violated its terms of use for Android phones. Once installed on the unwitting victim's phone, the Android phone app, called SMS Secret Replicator, automatically creates blind carbon copies of incoming text messages and forwards them to a selected number. Of course you have to sneak the password-protected app onto your partners' phones and set it to forward text messages to their own. But once it is installed it will continue to monitor without revealing itself.

The app was created by developer, DLP Mobile. Its chief executive, Zak Tanjeloff, said the app was "certainly controversial but can be helpful to people in relationships where this type of monitoring can be useful". We would have thought that once you were in such a relationship, the desire to spy on your partner would be a good indication that you should be out of it, or at the very least they should be ending it themselves.
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