Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 10 January 2008 22:24

Intel to expand Little Valley

Written by test

Image

Big on low-cost PCs


Intel's ultra-low cost mini ITX board won't be a one of a kind, and Intel is very keen on building a market around its Little Valley platform, although they're not as greedy as you'd think (well, maybe).

First of all, don't expect to see SiS chipsets on future revisions, as Intel will be using one of their own chipsets, some crippled 945/946 variant with support for only a single PCI slot looks to be the future of the platform.

There is, of course, the embedded Intel CPU, as well, and from what we've heard, the next generation CPU will lose the L2 cache. Let's hope this turns out to be a better chipset than the early Celeron processors without L2 cache.

Intel is also trying to get the big system integrators onboard, as well as the motherboard manufacturers, although we'd guess this would be of more interest to the OEM/ODM manufacturers than to the consumer motherboard companies.

Intel has put in force some fairly strict guidelines on how these new components are to be used, as these products are solely meant for the entry level end of the market, and it looks like this will be Intel's only single core CPU later this year.

The question is whether the market is there; but at least Intel seems to think so, as it should be far more affordable than a low-cost notebook and it should be possible to connect it to a wide range of screens, even TVs, if you haven't got anything better. Time will tell, but we should see the first products arrive later this year.
Last modified on Saturday, 12 January 2008 07:22

test

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments