Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 07 October 2010 10:15

T-Mobile G2 buyers fume at DRM

Written by Nick Farell
t-mobile_logo

Hardware rootkit under the bonnet
The early T-Mobile G2 buyers are finding that there is a microchip embedded into the handset which prevents device owners from making permanent changes that allow custom modifications to the the Android operating system.

It seems that a hardware rootkit restricts any modifications to a device owned by the user which limits the use of the phone in anyway that the manufacturer does not like. If you install anything dodgy, or even not recognised by the powers that be, the phone is capable of overriding your software changes and reinstalling the original firmware.

This is not so hot for those who have bought their android-powered phones to tinker.   There is already a 50 page thread over at xda developers who are not happy bunnies. The G2 is on pause at the moment because there is not enough available.  Some are thinking that this will give some hacker time to kill off the DRM when the phone becomes available again.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments