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Wednesday, 06 October 2010 10:39

Microsoft shoves a computer into a room

Written by Nick Farell
microsoft

One giant surface
Microsoft boffins are planning to turn an entire room into one giant computing surface. According to Cnet Andy Wilson and his team are designing LightSpace which turns a 3 meter by 2 meter room into a  surface computer.

The rooms floor, table, and a wall are all interactive. It does all this using  projectors and depth-sensing cameras. LightSpace lets a user do is take an object from, say a table, and sweep it into their hand or a plate or other object. "You see it in your hand," Wilson said in an interview today. "That's a very different interaction than just a surface."

One idea of using LightSpace to power some kind of next-generation conference room and hand out papers and throw them onto a wall. Wilson says he sees a lot of potential for moving to the use of three-dimensional objects, though that would certainly add cost and might require a user to wear special glasses.

Nick Farell

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