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Wednesday, 29 September 2010 22:56

MSI intros Twin Frozr GTX 480

Written by


$499
MSI has introduced the GTX 480 Twin Frozr II, which is basically a GF100 card with a proper cooler on top.

MSI’s Twin Frozr series cards sport massive heatpipe coolers and the GTX 480 is no exception. The 5-heatpipe cooler, which features two 8mm SuperPipes, reduces the temps by 14C and noise is also cut by 4dB. This is no small feat if you consider that a reference GTX 480 uses more power than a third world village and that it would probably make Beelzebub sweat like a pig.

Despite the massive cooler, MSI apparently chose to stick to reference clocks, so the GPU is clocked at 700MHz, shaders run at 1401MHz and the 1536MB of GDDR5 memory is clocked at 924MHz.

Newegg is listing it at $499.
Last modified on Wednesday, 29 September 2010 23:10
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Comments  

 
+10 #1 leftiszi 2010-09-29 23:04
...and then the Cayman XT comes out and is 25% faster and 25% cheaper.!
 
 
+11 #2 nele 2010-09-29 23:16
Quoting leftiszi:
...and then the Cayman XT comes out and is 25% faster and 25% cheaper.!


You forgot "25% cooler..."

Or more
 
 
+2 #3 Jaberwocky 2010-09-29 23:18
And is probably 25% cooler (I mean that it produces less heat.Not that it looks suitably fasionable:P )
 
 
-7 #4 Tr0y 2010-09-29 23:51
There are no miracles. With a 40nm design you get about 2.5 GFLOPS / Watt. No matter if it's Intel, ATI/AMD or NVidia.

So 6xxx cards may be faster than 5xxx cards - but they will also need more power.

A card with the same speed as the GTX480 will need the same power as the GTX480. Maybe +/- 20 watt (because of good/bad design).

That's simple math. So if Cayman XT is as fast as a GTX480, it will need 250 watt. Because it's also a 40nm design.

I like my 5770 - and I don't see why I should update. It consumes "only" 100 watt - and the performance is awesome.

Why would I buy a GTX480 or 6770 that needs 250 watt?
 
 
+7 #5 tekken 2010-09-30 00:08
Quoting Tr0y:
There are no miracles. With a 40nm design you get about 2.5 GFLOPS / Watt. No matter if it's Intel, ATI/AMD or NVidia.
.....

Why would I buy a GTX480 or 6770 that need 250 watt?


You could have simply written how you have absolutely no clue whatsoever about chip architecture and manufacturing, and leave it at that. Much less bandwidth and time wasted honestly.
 
 
+4 #6 AmdAti 2010-09-30 01:26
Quoting tekken:
Quoting Tr0y:
There are no miracles. With a 40nm design you get about 2.5 GFLOPS / Watt. No matter if it's Intel, ATI/AMD or NVidia.
.....

Why would I buy a GTX480 or 6770 that need 250 watt?


You could have simply written how you have absolutely no clue whatsoever about chip architecture and manufacturing, and leave it at that. Much less bandwidth and time wasted honestly.

I agree and add that gpu die size also has an effect on heat output.
 
 
-8 #7 Tr0y 2010-09-30 06:33
Quoting AmdAti:
I agree and add that gpu die size also has an effect on heat output.



Am I talking to idiots here?!?!

It's like I say: "A typical Petrol engine has an efficiency of 35 %" ... and you say: "But mine has 12 cylinders and needs more petrol".
 
 
+2 #8 Nerdmaster 2010-09-30 07:56
You have to be a computer engineer to figure out the chip consuption.

Also what most people do not know and gets on my nerves is that when we have a die shrink the exact same design draws 7 times more current (almost 7 times more power) because the leakage current increases as transistor size decreases.

The engineers then have to redesign the chip to decrease leakage current. A bad design draws way to much power. Thats why Fermi had huge power consumption like 280W (at least the first cards that came out to the market).
 
 
+3 #9 Nerdmaster 2010-09-30 07:59
A 700nm chip at Fermi size would have a leakage current of some mA and not 100A.

The conclusion is that 28nm and 22nm are gonna probably be even harder to use than 40nm.
 
 
+2 #10 Dev 2010-09-30 20:03
Quoting Tr0y:
There are no miracles. With a 40nm design you get about 2.5 GFLOPS / Watt. No matter if it's Intel, ATI/AMD or NVidia.


Why would I buy a GTX480 or 6770 that needs 250 watt?


6770 isnt in the market right now so u cant tell how much watt it will consume or performance would be better or worse than 480..but from 5870 consumption wise its clear that it will be on the lower side though .

It is a personal taste what will u drive on road or use in your mother board..
if every people on earth think like u then there will be only 2 type of graphics cards on the market..
 

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