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Tuesday, 21 September 2010 12:17

Check Point Software peddling scareware

Written by Nick Farell


ZoneAlarm firewall gear getting complaints
Complaints are coming in that the Check Point software is using the same technique of scaring people into using its products as cyber scammers.

For a while the FBI has been hunting for the scalps of those outfits which use scare tactics to strong-arm PC users into buying rogue antimalware products by claiming you have a virus.
Now it seems that Check Point which makes the ZoneAlarm Internet Security Suite, is doing the same thing.

ZoneAlarm punters report that they've been presented with a warning dialog that claims, "Global Virus Alert / Your PC may be in danger!... Threat Name: ZeuS.Zbot.aoaq ... is a new Trojan virus that steals banking passwords and financial account data."

The advert said that ZoneAlarm Free Firewall provides basic protection, but this new threat requires additional security. While it is true that ZeuS.Zbot is a very real threat, apparently even ZoneAlarm can't kick it off your machine.

But ZoneAlarm doesn't check to see if you're running an antivirus product, much less verify if the antivirus product detects ZeuS. So what this marketing own goal is doing is telling you to upgrade to the firewall that may or may not detect future ZeuS.Zbot variants' activities.

The official ZoneAlarm Twitter account spewed this pablum: "As a security vendor, we proactively let our customers know about newly discovered viruses so their PCs stay protected."

Yeah right.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+16 #1 johndgr 2010-09-21 12:36
"As a security vendor that cares only for money, we proactively scare our potential customers about newly discovered viruses so they are forced to pay for our products."
 
 
-8 #2 yourma2000 2010-09-21 13:40
shitty, unfair, (and in my opinion) illegal practices but they still do make the best firewall going
 
 
+2 #3 ghelyar 2010-09-21 17:10
Quoting yourma2000:
shitty, unfair, (and in my opinion) illegal practices but they still do make the best firewall going




Better than Cisco? Better than SonicWall? etc


ZA is a POS in the first place, bought solely by people who think they are being more secure without knowing anything at all about their security. For starters, real hackers don't target home users. Knowing that your audience scares easily is an ideal situation to employ scare tactics in marketing.
 
 
+5 #4 yourma2000 2010-09-21 22:21
Quote:
Better than Cisco? Better than SonicWall?



You're talking about hardware based firewalls which costs hundreds or even thousands, are you seriously suggesting people to go out and buy one of these units for their home PC because you think software based security suites are "a POS"?
 
 
0 #5 droid_hunter 2010-09-22 19:55
It makes you wonder if these companies make the viruses themselves(or pay a professional to do it) and then release it onto the web to scare people into buying their products. Not saying it is so, but in theory its possible.
 

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