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Thursday, 16 September 2010 09:33

Extreme Engineering reveals new military board

Written by Nick Farell
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Now you know what the big guns want
Extreme Engineering is releasing the XPedite553 conduction-cooled or air-cooled 3U CompactPCI single board computer based on Freescale Semiconductor's dual-core QorIQ P2020 processor. The computer is being designed for the space, weight, and power-constrained military.

Basically it is an embedded computing board which has two 1.2 GHz PowerPC e500 cores; as much as four gigabytes of DDR3-800 ECC SDRAM, 16 gigabytes of NAND flash, and 256 megabytes of redundant NOR flash.

There is also an XMC/PrPMC site; two Gigabit Ethernet ports, two serial ports, and one USB port; and software support that includes Green Hills INTEGRITY Board Support Package (BSP), Wind River VxWorks, and Linux.

They will be available in air-cooled, commercial version and a rugged, conduction-cooled versions. They are tested for shock, but apparently not awe, which is supposed to be a big thing in the US military.

Last modified on Thursday, 16 September 2010 11:52
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