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Wednesday, 15 September 2010 09:03

HD definition content protection cracked

Written by Nick Farell
hackers

Master key being shared online
A hacker has reportedly cracked high definition content protection and shared a "master key" on the world wide wibble. The master key means that the system no longer works, as hackers would now be able to create their own source and sink keys, both of which are needed to playback content on HDCP-protected devices.

It means that a perfect connection could always be ensured between transmitting and receiving devices. HDCP-protected content would be copyable.

The movie industry would be able to change the key, but since the hackers have the master key they could simply create a new active key, and build devices that could decode and copy content at its full quality. Furthermore, the studios would have a devil of a job revoking the key anyway as it would stop legitimate copies from working.

The system has been annoying the pants off iTunes users for two years. Some movies will not play on external displays due to those monitors not supporting HDCP. However since it is cheap as chips to set up it has proved popular.

For about a decade researchers were warning that it could be broken through reverse engineering. All the hacker needed was keys from about 50 or so devices.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+56 #1 AndreiD 2010-09-15 09:46
Did Hollywood really think they can beat millions of bored and intelligent people trying everything in their power to shaft them?
 
 
+14 #2 xbasti07x 2010-09-15 10:54
where do those guys gain that knowledge to do such things?
and well it was obvious it would end like this
 
 
0 #3 alick 2010-09-15 12:38
dus this mean we can play blue ray disc's with linux and more importantly with xbmc in linux
 
 
-1 #4 ghelyar 2010-09-15 13:21
Quoting alick:
dus this mean we can play blue ray disc's with linux and more importantly with xbmc in linux



Since DVDFab and AnyDVD HD both already do this on Windows, it's already theoretically possible. Linux developers tend to be a bit more ethical and legitimate though.


The article didn't make a whole lot of sense to me from a technical standpoint. This seems to be roughly the same as hacking verisign and stealing their private key.

Of course there's no way to invalidate the key because it would break all existing media. Even creating a new key would break all existing players.
 
 
+1 #5 Bl0bb3r 2010-09-15 14:21
Imagine if companies would all ship firmware updates for their devices to counter this hack.... and imagine if the customers would have to pay for them.
 
 
+1 #6 yasin 2010-09-15 17:18
to the writer-"A hacker has reportedly cracked high definition content protection and shared a "master key" on the world wide wibble."
lets be honest, its pretty easy to confirm a report like this if the code is all over the web. (not wibble).
 
 
0 #7 maximir 2010-09-15 20:57
Quoting yasin:
to the writer-"A hacker has reportedly cracked high definition content protection and shared a "master key" on the world wide wibble."
lets be honest, its pretty easy to confirm a report like this if the code is all over the web. (not wibble).

I dont think u get it. Saying "wibble" instead of "web" is being sarcastic.
 
 
-1 #8 yasin 2010-09-15 21:51
Quoting maximir:
Quoting yasin:
to the writer-"A hacker has reportedly cracked high definition content protection and shared a "master key" on the world wide wibble."
lets be honest, its pretty easy to confirm a report like this if the code is all over the web. (not wibble).

I dont think u get it. Saying "wibble" instead of "web" is being sarcastic.

ofc i get it.not many people are that retarded.maybe i should put a smiley in next time so people like you can understand.
 
 
+6 #9 rmyere 2010-09-16 08:48
Quote:
HD definition content protection cracked


Sooo.... HD definition. Maybe you could go to the ATM machine to get some money for your new HD definition TV vision.
 

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