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Thursday, 02 September 2010 21:49

Globalfoundries reveals 22nm/20nm advanced process roadmap

Written by Jon Worrel
globalfoundries

Risk production in 2H 2012, products in 2013
During its GTC 2010 technology conference, Globalfoundries announced an aggressive silicon foundry strategy with a new 28nm High-K metal gate (HKMG) fabrication process and for the first time has publicly unveiled its 22nm/20nm manufacturing roadmap.

Over the next few years, the company is expected to hold a strong focus on its three 28nm node offerings. These processes include a 28nm HPP (high-performance plus) offering targeted at smartphones requiring more than 2GHz of power, a 28nm HP (high-performance) offering targeted at wired applications such as enterprise servers and media processors, and a 28nm SLP (super-low power) offering targeted at power-sensitive mobile and consumer applications.

After risk production begins of its 28nm HPP (high-performance plus) node in the fourth quarter of 2011, the company plans to begin risk production of extremely dense 22nm/20nm advanced technologies in the second half of 2012. "We ramped to volume production at the 45/40nm generation well ahead of all [other] foundries and we are poised to maintain this leadership at 32/28nm, with plans to extend this to the 22/20nm node," said Gregg Bartlett, Globalfoundries senior VP of technology and R&D. To put the technology in perspective, the 22nm advanced process node has been cited to be just 25 percent the size of the current 45nm node used by both AMD and Intel today.

After risk production kicks off in the second half of 2012, Globalfoundries is set to introduce products based on 22nm/20nm advanced technologies sometime in 2013. In particular, the Dresden, Germany-based fab is already starting work on developing the 22nm CMOS process and will run the process in volume. "The 22nm node is being worked on in Fab 1, and elsewhere. Fab 1 will pilot ramp and go to some volume in 22nm," said Udo Nothelfer, General Manager of Fab 1 back in March. Development on the 22nm process has also been referenced to the IBM-led technology alliance between Globalfoundries, Infeneon, NEC, Samsung, Toshiba, STMicroelectronics and others.

In addition, the fabrication giant indicated that the 22/20nm technologies are planned to be a full node shrink from 32/28nm, and will utilize next-generation HKMG (hi-k metal gate) technology. The process lineup includes a 22nm SHP (super-high performance) offering targeted at devices requiring the utmost in performance, a 20nm HP (high-performance) offering targeted at wired applications such as enterprise servers and media processors, and a 20nm SLP (super-low power) offering targeted at power-sensitive mobile and consumer applications.

All in all, Globalfoundries' advanced process timeframes are in line with main rival TSMC's (Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company), but are behind Intel's. Based on current expectations, Intel plans to introduce the world's first 22nm technology in its Ivy Bridge processors (Sandy Bridge successor) at the beginning of 2012. In other words, Intel will come in first place with the 20nm SHP process, Globalfoundries will come in second and TSMC will place in third.

Last modified on Friday, 03 September 2010 09:04

Jon Worrel

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Comments  

 
+23 #1 BernardP 2010-09-03 02:13
OK guys, enough talk... Let's see those 32nm CPUs ASAP, Please.
 
 
+5 #2 Bl0bb3r 2010-09-03 15:36
Talking gets them clients... and more backup-plans so their business doesn't tank. Let them work on the 32nm until it's safe to use so we the guyz that pay for ware don't get screwed like in the case of nvidia.
 
 
0 #3 Nubstick 2010-09-03 19:26
From what I've read (I might have missed something) GF hasn't mentioned any timelines for their 28nm process recently. Old roadmaps show risk production starting in Q4'10, but with the slight slip in 32nm it leaves me wondering if 28nm is still on target or not.
 
 
0 #4 JAB Creations 2010-09-06 03:03
What company does Intel have manufacture their CPU's or do they manufacture their own CPU's? I know nVidia uses TSMC.
 
 
0 #5 jon 2010-09-06 08:38
Quoting JAB Creations:
What company does Intel have manufacture their CPU's or do they manufacture their own CPU's? I know nVidia uses TSMC.


Intel performs in-house chip manufacturing at its own fabrication plants, located in the United States, Ireland (largest outside of the US) and Israel. The company also has its own test/assembly sites located in Costa Rica and various countries in Southeast Asia.

List of Intel manufacturing sites:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_manufacturing_sites
 

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