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Tuesday, 24 August 2010 09:31

Sandy Bridge Core i7 2600K name explained

Written by Fuad Abazovic
corei7n_logo
The second generation Core
The name of the fastest Sandy Bridge is Core i7 2600K and we can give you an inside in the new naming scheme. First of all you will know that it’s a Sandy Bridge if you see a name with four digits starting with a number two.

Let’s dissect the Core i7 2600K moniker in segments and explain it. Intel Core is the brand of the CPU, i7 is the brand modifier that will help you distinct the features on a different cores. Number two in 2600 is the generation indicator meaning that this is the second generation of Intel’s Core architecture.

The 600 is the SKU numeric digits that will tell you which CPU you are getting and of course once again bigger numbers mean a better CPU.

The suffix K tells you that the CPU is unlocked and the other iterations such as suffix S will tell you that this is a CPU with performance optimised for lifestyle computing and T has Power Optimised Lifestyle whatever that would mean.

Once again, Intel has new chipset, new socket, new names and of course if you want the Sandy Bridge you will have to throw or sell your Nehalem Core i based system and get a new one with a socket that is only one pin shy of its predecessor
Last modified on Tuesday, 24 August 2010 09:43
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Comments  

 
+14 #1 B0GiE-uk- 2010-08-24 10:17
I see absolutely no reason to upgrade from 1366. What the hell are intel playing at? Why bring out a whole load of new processors that are only going to be equal in speed and lacking overclocking options. I see Epic Fail for Sandybridge. Maybe this will give AMD a chance to catch up.
 
 
-23 #2 boobster 2010-08-24 10:47
Sandy Bridge is not a replacement for S1366. I see epic fail in your post.
 
 
+24 #3 turingpest 2010-08-24 11:04
Sandy Bridge is the exact reason that I went with AMD for my latest rig, which was completed about 4 months ago. There's no way in hell that I was gonna buy a socket 1156 board that would only allow for only one generation of cpu architecture, especially when it's only, as the article states, one pin different and therefore nothing but profiteering from Intel. My AM3 board was not only cheaper than the Intel equivalent but will almost certainly allow me to upgrade my dirt cheap unlocked quad Phenom II to a Bulldozer chip next year.

If Intel had offered a worthwhile upgrade path then I probably would've paid the extra and gone with them, if only for the increased single-threaded performance I would've had over my Phenom II (which I hope will be rectified somewhat with Bulldozer).
 
 
+5 #4 BernardP 2010-08-24 12:15
Yes, Intel seems to be abusing its position, but AFAIK, AMD has not confirmed that Bulldozer will be compatible with the current AM3 chipset. The chipset for Bulldozer is listed as AM3r2 (Revision 2). There must be a reason for the r2 suffix.
 
 
+1 #5 Mr T 2010-08-24 12:24
Lulz. We keep reading the "I'm glad I went AMD", granted they keep the same socket, but if I'm not mistaken it's not quite clear yet if that's the case so maybe a little more precautions would be of some use. Besides isn't Bulldozer supposed to be reserved to high end and therefore in competition with intel's 2011 Sandy Bridge rather than mainstream 1155 ? No point in comparing if that's the case.

Sandy Bridge has the potential to be a great architecture. It'll be a shame if it locks most of its OC potential but nothing's quite certain for now. But if it doesn't, with its decent base clocks you would be able to reach sky high frequencies.
 
 
+10 #6 ghelyar 2010-08-24 12:48
Quote:
Number two in 2600 is the generation indicator meaning that this is the second generation of Intel’s Core architecture.


Wouldn't that be "Core 2", as in Conroe Merom etc. "Core" (1) being Yonah etc

If this is the second generation of anything it would be the second generation of "Core i"
 
 
+1 #7 Squall_Leonhart 2010-08-24 13:34
Quoting B0GiE-uk-:
I see absolutely no reason to upgrade from 1366. What the hell are intel playing at? Why bring out a whole load of new processors that are only going to be equal in speed and lacking overclocking options. I see Epic Fail for Sandybridge. Maybe this will give AMD a chance to catch up.


the 1366 socket pinout can only handle up to 3 channels of DDR while LGA 2011 allows for the expanded logic for the new quad controller in the new high end Sandy Bridge processors.
 
 
+5 #8 Bl0bb3r 2010-08-24 13:37
Quoting Mr T:
Besides isn't Bulldozer supposed to be reserved to high end and therefore in competition with intel's 2011 Sandy Bridge rather than mainstream 1155 ? No point in comparing if that's the case.


You're talking about the core or platform?

If it's the platform, then yes, Bulldozer is going after Sandy.

If it's the core than a 2 BD cores (4 cores) can spank Nehalem 1156 several ways and hopefully at a better price.
 
 
+2 #9 The_Wolf88 2010-08-24 14:17
Quoting turingpest:
My AM3 board was not only cheaper than the Intel equivalent but will almost certainly allow me to upgrade my dirt cheap unlocked quad Phenom II to a Bulldozer chip next year.


I doubt that !

AMD bulldozer architecture won't be compatible with AM2+ and AM3 sockets ! Because they will come in totally new packages !
 
 
+3 #10 Bl0bb3r 2010-08-24 14:41
That remains to be seen... I agree that there will be new packages, but it's also doable on the current AM3 socket.
 

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