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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 31 December 2007 13:18

U.S. bans loose lithium batteries on flights

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Image

Fire concerns


Air travelers
will only be allowed to carry two lithium batteries in checked luggage, and only if they are installed in electronic devices.

Carrying extra batteries which are not installed in a device will be totally forbidden. This is because the authorities are terrified that they will catch fire, which will be impossible to put out.

The Transportation Department said the ban affects shipments of non-rechargeable lithium batteries, such as those made by Energizer and Duracell.

Krista Edwards, Deputy Administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, wrote in a press release that keeping a spare battery in its original retail packaging or a plastic zip-lock bag will prevent unintentional short-circuiting and fires.

More here.

Last modified on Wednesday, 02 January 2008 07:51

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