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Tuesday, 10 August 2010 09:15

Kinect can read sign language

Written by Nick Farell


So don't do that one when you get a low score
A patent listing for Microsoft's gesture-recognition technology says the gear will recognises American Sign Language and can and read lips. It looks like the $150 full-body motion-, facial-, and vocal-recognition technology, Kinect, will read lips, track toe movement, and recognize sign language for those who cannot speak.

The patent says that when the user is unable to speak, under the present system, he could make ASL gestures to convey his thoughts, which would then be transmitted to the other users for auditory display. Microsoft's patent says that when the user kills another user's character, that victorious, though speechless, user would be able to tell the other user that he had been 'PWNED'.

We would have thought stronger words would have been used, but we wonder if Microsoft would translate them. A user may be able to speak or make the facial motions corresponding to speaking words. The system may then parse those facial motions to determine the user's intended words and process them according to the context under which they were input to the system.

Microsoft's Kinect will be released on November 4 by itself for $150 in the United States and £129.99 in the United Kingdom. The new technology, which Microsoft is treating like a new system launch, will also be available in a $300 hardware/software bundle on launch day.

Nick Farell

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