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Wednesday, 21 July 2010 13:30

iPhone App sneaks past Jobs

Written by Nick Farell


It is far too useful
An app which is actually useful has managed to sneak past the censors at Apple.

Handy Light is a newly-available flashlight app for the iPhone. However it is actually a tethering utility that lets you share your phone’s Internet connection with your laptop. It is exactly the sort of thing that customers want, but Steve Jobs says they can't have.

Normally it would be censored as soon as its intention was discovered, but Handy Light managed to trick its way past Apple’s App Store reviewers. To enable tethering, you need to configure an ad-hoc wireless network on your Mac, connect the iPhone to it, tweak some network and proxy settings, launch the app, and then literally tap a coded sequence of flashlight colours.

You can't discover the hack by exploring; you need to read detailed step-by-step instructions to get it to work and these have been posted on the world wide wibble. The application is like the $10 NetShare app—which was axed by Apple nearly two years ago. The reason Apple don't like it is that it shares Internet connection without AT&T getting a cent.

It is not likely to be available for long.
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