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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 21 July 2010 08:53

HD 5750 512MB CrossFireX pitted against GTX 460 - part 2 - 4. Conclusion

Written by Sanjin Rados
crossfirexnvidia_black

Review: CrossFire makes sense in mainstream


However, when it comes down to value for money, two HD 5750 cards look like a much better deal than a factory overclocked Gainward GTX 460 GS-GLH. In fact, two HD 5750s will set you back around €200, while the overclocked GTX 460 costs some 15% more. On the other hand, the cheapest reference GTX 460 cards are available for around €180, but they would not be able to match the GS-GHL card in terms of performance as it is clocked at 800MHz, or some 18 percent over the reference clock.

While it might seem like an odd comparison, it proves an interesting point. In some scenarios you are better off with two cheaper cards rather than a single pricey card. In fact, this fact could work against Nvidia, as the GTX 460 has made the GTX 480 quite pointless for gamers. Two GTX 460 cards cost quite a bit less than a GTX 480, yet they deliver more performance. Two mainstream cards in CrossFireX make sense for users on a budget, as they will be able to easily upgrade if there is need for more performance at some point. It’s worth noting that graphics card prices tend to tumble as soon as new architectures are introduced, so bargain hunters could wait for a few months and score a second card at ridiculously low prices.

Both ATI and Nvidia have managed to vastly improve scaling in multi-GPU configurations, and they are becoming more tempting with every driver update.

 

 

(Page 4 of 4)
Last modified on Wednesday, 21 July 2010 11:47
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Comments  

 
+11 #1 DaEmpi 2010-07-21 13:41
I wouldn't consider a CFX setup with 42 FPS to be better, than any single card at 36 FPS. You can't compare the FPS from a single card with the ones from CFX as 36 FPS on a single GPU feel much smoother than 42 on CFX.

Conclusion: Poorly investigated as this article tries to find out which setup offers a better "bang for the buck" and its recommendation is not correct for real world applications.
 
 
+16 #2 friskyolive 2010-07-21 14:19
one 512 and one 1gb in crossfire will remain 512kb, results are bogus.
 
 
+4 #3 stringfellow 2010-07-21 14:34
This is a silly exercise.

My guess is that there are only a few people in the entire world (if any!) who bought a high-end motherboard (i.e., one that does full 2 x 16 PCIe rather than 16 + 4), who then purchase a low end card such as the 5750.

The review needs to use a low end mobo to have any meaningful conclusion. A 16+4 mobo will run a GTX460 perfectly, but will hamstring a Crossfire set up (let alone if it even CAN run Crossfire vs. SLI).
 
 
+6 #4 ASilver 2010-07-21 16:10
There is another factor to consider for the enthusiast: overclockabilit y. Usually this is an iffy exercise, and gains are modest, unless the user knows what they are doing, or has invested in cooling solutions (which adds to the cost), but nVidia's statement on these 675MHz cards reaching 800 comfortably have been vindicated not only by its partners, but in testing. And this without insane heat gains or noise. Here is one test for example:

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/graphics/2010/07/21/overclocking-nvidia-s-geforce-gtx-460/1
 
 
+3 #5 gangsta072 2010-07-21 16:22
A vga with only 512mb ram is nonsense in todays DX application - no matter the quality or resolution , also i dislike the idea of multi gpu setup and would always prefer a single high end VGA , especially seeing the 58xx running the RAM at death limit reminds me of 4890 specs.
But thats my opinion.
 
 
-4 #6 MrScary 2010-07-22 07:55
Quoting DaEmpi:
I wouldn't consider a CFX setup with 42 FPS to be better, than any single card at 36 FPS. You can't compare the FPS from a single card with the ones from CFX as 36 FPS on a single GPU feel much smoother than 42 on CFX.

Conclusion: Poorly investigated as this article tries to find out which setup offers a better "bang for the buck" and its recommendation is not correct for real world applications.

What are u saying??? better/smother performance from only one vga at 36fps than CFX at 42 fps, are u smoking? lets say that those 36 fps with only 1 card will turn into 10 fps minimun fps, 36 avg FPS...2 CFX cards will do that 36 fps minimun, no low point, and 42 avg, smoother game flow and more capacityto handle loads.
 
 
-1 #7 MrScary 2010-07-22 07:57
Quoting friskyolive:
one 512 and one 1gb in crossfire will remain 512kb, results are bogus.

Unfair review u said it, 2 Powercolors 1Gb should beat that Gainward GLH, at the same price....
 
 
+1 #8 MrScary 2010-07-22 08:02
Quoting stringfellow:
This is a silly exercise. My guess is that there are only a few people in the entire world (if any!) who bought a high-end motherboard (i.e., one that does full 2 x 16 PCIe rather than 16 + 4), who then purchase a low end card such as the 5750. The review needs to use a low end mobo to have any meaningful conclusion. A 16+4 mobo will run a GTX460 perfectly, but will hamstring a Crossfire set up (let alone if it even CAN run Crossfire vs. SLI).

U are wrong, the review is ok, just like when legionhardware posted a review with 4770 CF beating up nvidia 280/295...There are many ppl with 5750/5770, when the prices go down it should be a good thing to cf with another cheap pair. 5750 is no low end, is excellent performance card, low end is crappy n210
 
 
0 #9 boobster 2010-07-22 08:42
Quoting gangsta072:
A vga with only 512mb ram is nonsense in todays DX application - no matter the quality or resolution , also ...



Your post is nonsense. In this test Metro 2033 shows a difference of 1.15fps between the two cards. The other two games are less than 1fps difference.
 
 
+3 #10 DaEmpi 2010-07-22 09:22
Quoting MrScary:
What are u saying??? better/smother performance from only one vga at 36fps than CFX at 42 fps, are u smoking? lets say that those 36 fps with only 1 card will turn into 10 fps minimun fps, 36 avg FPS...2 CFX cards will do that 36 fps minimun, no low point, and 42 avg, smoother game flow and more capacityto handle loads.


The problem isn't the number of FPS. Yes the number is higher. But with CFX the frames aren't distributed evenly over time. This leads to micro stuttering.

If you need more information on micro stuttering: Google is your friend. You can also find an article on Wikipedia.
 

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