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Tuesday, 20 July 2010 11:10

Oracle's buy-out still creates more problems for Sun

Written by Nick Farell


Customers miffed
It is turning out that Oracle's buy out of Sun is causing more trouble for the hardware maker. It seems that customers are getting miffed that the software house does not really know what how to run a hardware outfit.

Sun customers appear to be frustrated by the lack of a detailed product roadmap for computer systems. Customers were confused about Oracle's product plans for Sun, and still waiting to hear specifics. Gartner analyst George Weiss in a report said that despite hearing a January 2010 webcast on Oracle's intentions with Sun, and various Oracle messages and advertisements, Gartner clients have told us of their frustrations with the Oracle and Sun sales teams. “Clients say that they are not getting straight and clear answers to the questions that are vital to their strategic IT planning efforts," noted Weiss.

According to Marketwatch customers are getting nervous that the company would stop developing future products in Sun's proprietary SPARC chip family, a more powerful and expensive chip line than server chips produced by Intel. Most users have concluded that UltraSPARC is not going anywhere and the question will Oracle decide to get out of the proprietary microprocessor business?

Oracle said that it will be addressing customers soon, possibly at the company's big user conference in September. Weiss also said that he now believes Oracle is not planning on phasing out Sun's SPARC technology.

Nick Farell

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