Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 20 July 2010 08:11

PS3 720p limitation of HDMI 1.4

Written by David Stellmack


No one wants games 1080p at 24 fps
More specifics about the directive from Sony regarding 3D content being capped at 720p have come to light. The issue isn’t actually with the PlayStation 3 itself, but rather the HDMI 1.4 standard which limits resolutions to 720p 60fps, 720p 50fps, and 1080p 24fps.

No one would really want to play any type of a fast moving title 3D or otherwise at 24 frames per second, and this means that the logical choice is to limit the titles to 720p where developers can take advantage of the higher frame rates. The decision by Sony to enforce this restriction is actually logical, given the design of the PS3.

It is possible to achieve 1080p resolutions with a dual DVI setup to achieve higher frame rates as done with graphics adapters on the PC platform; and while apparently the GPU inside of the PS3 is technically able to achieve this kind of output, it isn’t supported, as there is no second video output connector supported on the new 3D TVs.

The decision to enforce this restriction might sound rather draconian; the reality is there just isn’t another option given the current hardware design combined with the 3D TVs that are being released. However, we honestly doubt that most players will ever notice; and would you want to play 3D games at 24 fps, anyway?  24fps is good for 3D movie watching, but not for gaming.

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments