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Wednesday, 14 July 2010 17:05

Watchdog breaks privacy rules

Written by Nick Farell
y_globe

ESA published complainants' addresses
Players who appealed to the Entertainment Software Ratings Board over Blizzard's Real ID plans are probably wishing they hadn't.

Punters were upset that Blizzard was planning to ruin their privacy day by using their real names on bulletin boards. According to WoW.com, the ESRB issued a response letter to the nearly 1,000 folks who had emailed with complaints about Blizzard's decision. And in this age of technology someone hit "reply all" which gave 1,000 real email addresses to everyone.

Ironically the letter ends with a statement espousing the ESRB's "Privacy Online" program. “ESRB, through its Privacy Online program, helps companies develop practices to safeguard users' personal information online while still providing a safe and enjoyable video game experience for all.

We appreciate your taking the time to contact us with your concerns, and please feel free to direct any future inquiries you may have regarding online privacy to our attention, the letter said. Oh dear.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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