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Monday, 21 June 2010 09:52

25W Athlon 260u shipping in Europe

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As cool as it gets
AMD is no stranger to power efficient desktop CPUs, but the chipmaker appears to have outdone itself with the new Athlon II X2 260u.

We already mentioned the 260u on several occasions, so here is the lowdown. It’s based on the 45nm Regor core, clocked 1.8GHz and it has 2MB of L2 cache. It supports DDR3-1333 and all the usual instruction sets and features.

Of course, the really big deal is the 25W TDP. In fact, this is even lower than many mobile parts, as both Intel and AMD don’t mind sticking 35W chips in notebooks.

The only complaint is the price tag. At €79, the 260u is no bargain. For roughly the same AMD will happily sell you the Athlon II X2 245e, a 2.9GHz part with a 45W TDP.

Despite this, the 260u could have a bright future if vendors embrace it for nettops and other SFF designs.

You can buy it here, but we suggest you wait for the prices to settle down.
Last modified on Monday, 21 June 2010 11:03
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+7 #1 mrgerbik 2010-06-21 16:42
If you have a motherboard that supports undervolting, try lowering the voltage/multi on a vanilla 240 first. Instead of dropping premium dough for a low TDP part, pay almost 1/2 as much and almost be guaranteed a similarly low wattage "premium" part.
Ive been running my 240 @ 1.10v/ 2600MHz for months now no problems. (I believe it works out to around 30-35W).
I love AMD. :)
 
 
+4 #2 nele 2010-06-21 17:04
I agree. Eliot has also done similar tests with various AMD processors.

However, an out-of-the-box 25W part still means a lot for system integrators. I'd like to see some nettops or barebones based around this baby...
 

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