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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 10 June 2010 11:04

Gainward GTX 465 Good Edition reviewed - 10. Conclusion

Written by Sanjin Rados
Image

Review: The best Fermi overclocking potential so far


Conclusion

Gainward’s GTX 465 Good Edition is a reference clocked card, and we were pretty surprised to see that Gainward didn’t push the card further after strapping it with such a quality cooler. Still, if the clocks were higher, this card would cost more, whereas now it will set you back no more than a reference card will. In fact, the card is very close to being the most affordable GTX 465. We must say that it’s been a while since we’ve seen such overclocking potential, as we managed to push the card from 607MHz to 790MHz, which is more than 30% more juice.

Gainward managed to make one of the best GTX 465 cards around, as the card packs great overlocking potential, a fine dual-slot cooler and a standard HDMI connector (rather than Nvidia’s mini-HDMI out found on reference designs). Furthermore, the card also comes with two dual-link DVI outs and a DisplayPort connector. Note however, that only two outs can be used at the same time.

Unfortunately, such performance comes at a price and the GTX 465’s power consumption is pretty high; in fact, it’s comparable to GTX 470’s consumption.

All in all, the GTX 465 Good is indeed a “good” gaming card, and it’s some 25% slower than the GTX 470. We believe it will prove to be popular with those looking for a sub-€290 DirectX11 cards.

Unfortunately, while the GTX 465 is a pretty good card and certainly the most affordable Nvidia’s DirectX 11 product, the price is still not right, especially after considering the competition. In fact, same money can buy you an HD 5850, and you could easily see throughout our tests that the HD 5850 is simply faster.

If you’re looking for CUDA and PhysX support and are keen on purchasing Nvidia’s DirectX 11 card without having to spend a fortune, then Gainward’s GTX 465 Good card is the one for you. If its performance doesn’t blow your mind right out of the box, you can always resort to some overclocking and push the card to similar performance levels of the GTX 470.

The card is priced at about 262 euro, and you can find it here.


(Page 10 of 10)
Last modified on Monday, 21 June 2010 13:26
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