Featured Articles

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC has announced that it will begin volume production of 16nm FinFET products in the second half of 2015, in late…

More...
AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD has missed earnings targets and is planning a substantial job cuts. The company reported quarterly earnings yesterday and the street is…

More...
Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

As expected, Google has finally released the eagerly awaited Nexus 6 phablet and its first 64-bit device, the Nexus 9 tablet.

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Saturday, 27 March 2010 02:15

GTX 480 Fermi reviewed, finally - A Closer Look

Written by Sanjin Rados

Image

Review: Fast, pricey and hot










Geforce GTX 480 is a dual-slot card, which is common with high end cards, but it is not quite common seeing a reference card with a heatpipe solution. You’ll notice that in an effort to deliver thermals that would satisfy the GTX 480’s hot ticker, most of the card’s “hood” is actually the heatsink itself and plastic is there mostly for purposes of making sure the heat leaves the case via air outlets on the I/O panel, and that cooler blows towards the heatsink.

Image

A glance at Geforce GTX 480 would suggest that the card comes with 4 heatpipes, although the card packs 5 in total, as is evident from the picture where we took the plastic hood off. We must admit it looks great with the chrome look and it sure looks like it has what it takes to dissipate heat from the GF100 GPU. GTX 480 has TDP of 250W (at idle consumes about 55W) and it needs external power via one 8-pin and one 6-pin connector. Recommended PSU for the GTX 480 is 600W whereas for GTX 470 Nvidia recommends a 550W PSU (GTX 470 has TDP od 215W).

Image

The fan looks much like the one on the current high end Radeon cards, and it can be very loud when GPU is hot. We measured about 65°C in idle mode and about 92°C in 3D with peak at 97°C.

Image

Image

Nvidia was pretty conservative with usage of plastics, as the GTX 480's hood is basically a light frame with big holes in the middle where the heatsink and the fan are placed.

Image

All the power components are cooled by the fan and passive heatsink, as you can see from the following picture. Nvidia is using a Delta fan, which is rated at 1.8 A.

Image

Nvidia resorted to using the same trick they used on the dual-GPU GTX 295 for air supply - this card features a hole in the PCB behind the fan as well. There's also an air outlet on the I/O panel and it's similar to that on the GTX 285.

Image

Power connectors are located on the top of the card.

 

Image


The I/O panel features two standard dual link DVI outs as well as one miniHDMI. Despite the card supporting DisplayPort, Nvidia thought more users will need HDMI, so DisplayPort implementation will be up to partners. GF100 support HDMI 1.4 and everything that's needed in regards to 3D TV etc.

In case you're looking to use three displays with Nvidia 3D Vision technology, you'll have to reach further into your pockets for another card as one card will allow for two displays only.


Image

 

Unlike the GTX 285's cooler, the GTX 480's cooler is pretty easy to disassemble, which will make mounting water cooling easy. If you think that watercooling is overkill in this case, note that three GTX 480 cards get so hot that triple SLI is not advised with air cooling alone.



(Page 2 of 9)
Last modified on Wednesday, 14 April 2010 23:08
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments