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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 29 December 2009 13:25

Gainward GTX 285 tested - 4. Gaming: Far Cry 2, World in Conflict. Crysis

Written by Sanjin Rados

 

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Review: The GTX 285 can still deliver a mean punch









Far Cry 2

Gaming with Gainward GTX 285 2GB is a treat. No matter what game and resolution you pick, this game will provide you with smooth gaming experience with all the special effects on. We ran Far Cry 2 at 2560x1600 at 50fps, something not many cards are capable of. Radeon HD 5870 scores about 20% better, but bear in mind that it came out almost a year later.


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World in Conflict

World in Conflict shows that both graphics cards are capable of spinning the game at maximum possible settings. At 2560x1600 and antialiasing on, Gainward's GTX 285 2GB scores 32fps, which is only 3fps lower than the result scored by Radeon HD 5870. Turning antialiasing off underlines the importance of frame buffer capacity, and in such scenarios Gainward ran up to 25% slower than ATI's new card.

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Crysis

Crysis is a tough nut to crack for many cards, but Gainward's card proves that it has what it takes. The card scores 45fps at 1920x1200 and 26fps at 2560x1600 with in-game detail settings at "high". Quadruple antialiasing is possible only at 1920x1200 as the same scenario at 2560x1600 can't manage a playable framerate. A glance at all the tested games and resolutions shows that Crysis is the only game that significantly benefited from the introduction of Radeon HD 5870 cards.

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Last modified on Tuesday, 29 December 2009 12:43
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