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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Saturday, 29 August 2009 18:38

OCZ Blade Low Voltage DDR2 Kit

Written by Eliot Kucharik

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Review: low power, high price

For about two years the DDR2 market stayed unchanged without any inventions. While many vendors do concentrate on DDR3 which is catching up to DDR2, OCZ decided not to left out DDR2 users. Intel forced memory-chip makers to reduce voltage for the overclocking parts. Long ago we pointed out DDR3 memory over 2.00V is just insane. So the market turned and you get bunches of high-end DDR3 kits running at "only" 1.65V. In the DDR2 market this not really necessary, but OCZ decided to offer their overclocking DDR2 lines running at stock voltage of 1.80V.

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With speeds up to 1200MHz at 1.80V your board doesn't need to support over-voltaging the memory. Even if it is supported, increasing voltages does strain the components on the mainboard and may cause early failure, besides increased temperatures inside the casing. Now it's time to test what this product can do for you.



Testbed:

Motherboard:
MSI DKA790GX (provided by MSI)
AMD 790GX/SB750
BIOS: 1.9beta4
Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3P (provided by Gigabyte)
Intel P45/iCH10R
BIOS: F7

CPU:
AMD Phenom II 965 Black Edition (provided by AMD)
Intel QX9650  (provided by Intel)

CPU-Cooler:
Scythe Kabuto (provided by Scythe-Europe)

Memory:
Kingston HyperX 2GB Kit PC2-9600U KHX1200D2K2/2G (provided by Kingston)
1066MHz CL5-5-5-15 CR2T at 2.20V @ AMD
1150MHz CL5-5-5-18 CR2T at 2.30V @ Intel
OCZ Blade 4GB Kit PC2-9200U OCZ2B1150LV4GK (provided by OCZ)
1066MHz CL5-5-5-15 CR2T at 1.80V @ AMD
1150MHz CL5-5-5-18 CR2T at 1.80V @ Intel

Graphics Card:
MSI R4850-2D1G-OC (provided by MSI)

Power supply:
PC Power & Cooling Silencer 500W (provided by PC Power & Cooling)

Hard disk:
Samsung F1 1000GB (provided by Ditech)

Case fans:
SilenX iXtrema Pro 14dB(A) (provided by PC-Cooling.at)
Scythe DFS122512LS

Case:
Cooler Master Stacker 831 Lite (provided by Cooler Master)




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Last modified on Saturday, 29 August 2009 17:41
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