Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 17 July 2009 06:40

AMD Phenom II under-voltaging - 2 Dual- and Triple-Cores

Written by Eliot Kucharik
ImageImage

Review: How to get the most performance at the lowest power consumption



Dual and triple-core CPUs can't be that very efficient compared to quad-cores. These CPUs are all crippled quad-cores, due to the architecture the cores are disabled but have to run regardless, otherwise the memory-controller could not be accessed. This is a design flaw, hopefully fixed with the next AMD family, so cores can really be shut off completely. So if you have to buy a smaller CPU due to budget constraints go for a triple-core.

The CPUs normally run with about 1.300V VCore which is quite high. Some CPUs will come with 1.250V but all our CPUs run with at least 1.300V. The energy-efficient 705e runs with 1.175V which has shown to save some energy. Let's see how low we can get. Please note, that not any CPU will get that low or some will go even lower. Also make sure you have a board which will support under-voltaging. Just decrease the CPU voltage, don't fiddle with the CPU VID voltage, because it will increase idle-power consumption. We have no idea how that is calculated, but the VID is also responsible for the idle-voltage. 


The newly introduced Phenom II X2 went down to 1.180V from it's original 1.325V:
Image

Image

The 705e went down from 1.175V  to 0.995V, that's quite nice.
Image

Image

The 720 did well too, down to 1.150V.
Image

Image




(Page 2 of 4)
Last modified on Friday, 17 July 2009 12:00
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments