Featured Articles

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

Intel's 5th Core processor family, codenamed Broadwell, will launch in three lines for the mobile segment. We are talking about upcoming…

More...
Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Google's Chromebook OS should be updating automatically every six weeks, but Intel doesn't come close with its hardware refresh schedule.

More...
New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

Rumours involving upcoming Nexus devices are nothing uncommon, but this year there is a fair bit of confusion, especially on the…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 17 July 2009 06:40

AMD Phenom II under-voltaging - 2 Dual- and Triple-Cores

Written by Eliot Kucharik
ImageImage

Review: How to get the most performance at the lowest power consumption



Dual and triple-core CPUs can't be that very efficient compared to quad-cores. These CPUs are all crippled quad-cores, due to the architecture the cores are disabled but have to run regardless, otherwise the memory-controller could not be accessed. This is a design flaw, hopefully fixed with the next AMD family, so cores can really be shut off completely. So if you have to buy a smaller CPU due to budget constraints go for a triple-core.

The CPUs normally run with about 1.300V VCore which is quite high. Some CPUs will come with 1.250V but all our CPUs run with at least 1.300V. The energy-efficient 705e runs with 1.175V which has shown to save some energy. Let's see how low we can get. Please note, that not any CPU will get that low or some will go even lower. Also make sure you have a board which will support under-voltaging. Just decrease the CPU voltage, don't fiddle with the CPU VID voltage, because it will increase idle-power consumption. We have no idea how that is calculated, but the VID is also responsible for the idle-voltage. 


The newly introduced Phenom II X2 went down to 1.180V from it's original 1.325V:
Image

Image

The 705e went down from 1.175V  to 0.995V, that's quite nice.
Image

Image

The 720 did well too, down to 1.150V.
Image

Image




(Page 2 of 4)
Last modified on Friday, 17 July 2009 12:00
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments