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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 11 November 2008 13:39

Core i7 beats them all - 7 x264

Written by Eliot Kucharik


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Review: Fast, but expensive



x264:

While benching x264 we noticed enabling Hyperthreading does hurt the results considerably. So this is the only benchmark where we have disabled it by default. Because we need comparable results we do use a rather old binary, we will have a follow up article concentrating on gaming where we will check out, if this is still a problem or just related to this old build. For some reason the x264 bench will crash the QX9650 4GHz test-setup, just believe us, when we tell you, it's much faster.

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Of course, we also checked if triple or dual channel memory interface makes a difference:

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Because x264 is also very demanding on the memory interface, we thought it's the best benchmark suited to point out the differences in memory speed. We did get the first 3GB Kingston kit just at the end of last week and would have liked to bench more, but we were not able to achieve low latencies with lower speeds. This kit is aimed for high speeds, not low latencies.

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As you can see, there is only a 1 FPS difference between 1066MHz and 1600MHz, so it's better for your purse to buy the 1066MHz modules, as they will get cheaper because demand from OEMs will increase. To invest in high-speed memory modules is just a waste of money, in our opinion.

(Page 7 of 9)
Last modified on Sunday, 18 January 2009 23:58
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