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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 06 October 2008 12:27

Dual-core Atom 330 tested - 2 Benchmarks

Written by Eliot Kucharik

 

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Review: Cheap board does its job

 

Benchmarks: 

As you can imagine, two Atom N270 cores can't provide us with any performance miracles, but if you use software which can utilize two or four cores, the CPU will suffice for standard working environments.

 

Celeron 220:

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Atom 330:

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No surprises here, the Atom FPU/SSE Unit is still lame.

 

Celeron 220:

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Atom 330:

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SuperPI runs only in one thread.

 

Sandra shows better results, because it utilizes all cores of any CPU::

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Here we see, the Atom 330 scales well, but it's no match for a cheap desktop CPU such as the old E4000 series. But at least the new Atom 330 can leave the Celeron 220 way behind, at least when using two cores/four threads.

 

(Page 2 of 3)
Last modified on Tuesday, 07 October 2008 03:05
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