Featured Articles

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 24 March 2008 05:45

Intel E8200 reviewed

Written by Eliot Kucharik
Image

Review: Not that good for overclockers


One month ago we reviewed the Intel E8400 here. We could not determine if the smaller brother E8200 will be that good, as well, so we took a chance to test a boxed E8200. This CPU is, of course, slower at nominal speeds, but we will concentrate on overclocking only.

ImageImage

At nominal speeds the CPU runs at 2.67GHz with an 8x multiplier. Otherwise, it's identical to the E8400 with 6MB 2nd level cache, 2x 32kB 1st level cache, FSB is also running at 333MHz.

ImageImage

We predicted that even an E8200 could reach 4GHz, and it did. But, it does take about 1.60V VCore; due to its 8x multiplier your board needs to reach 500MHz FSB; your memory has to at least be able to run at 1000MHz, as better results need better memory. We could not manage a better overclock due to the already very high VCore @ 1.60V.

ImageImage

Conclusion

The best compromise is a 3.60GHz overclock; it does not take that much voltage and runs with 450MHz FSB. The problem with the E8000 series is availability. While E8400 are almost nowhere in stock - backorders in Europe are in the range of three to five weeks, the E8200 can be an alternative, especially when you plan to buy a new system.

3.60GHz is quite a nice achievement, a 1GHz overclock. Reaching 4GHz is more difficult; you need a very high VCore of 1.60V, and it also does take a board which can reach 500MHz FSB. Some boards, especially the low-priced ones, can't do that always. Your memory needs to run at least with 1GHz. Our Biostar board, reviewed here, was able to do it, but it needed more voltage on the Northbridge and FSB to run the board in stable mode.

An E8400 is only €20,- more expensive compared to an E8200, but memory reaching 1.2GHz costs €50,-more or double the price of a standard 800MHz DDR2 CL4 2GB memory kit. For overclockers, the E8400 is the much better CPU,;consider the E8200 if you need a new system now.

You can check the CPU prices here.

Last modified on Monday, 24 March 2008 13:43
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments