Featured Articles

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

Intel's 5th Core processor family, codenamed Broadwell, will launch in three lines for the mobile segment. We are talking about upcoming…

More...
Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Google's Chromebook OS should be updating automatically every six weeks, but Intel doesn't come close with its hardware refresh schedule.

More...
New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

Rumours involving upcoming Nexus devices are nothing uncommon, but this year there is a fair bit of confusion, especially on the…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 07 February 2008 18:31

Overclocked MSI R3870 X2 tested

Written by Sanjin Rados

Image

Review: 2 GPUs at 860MHz

 

We had a chance to test one of MSI's best cards, the R3870 X2. It's a dual-chip Radeon HD 3870, but this time it's MSI's overclocked version.

Die Grafik "http://www.fudzilla.com/images/stories/2008/January/Reviews/3870X2%20MSI/3870x2_msi_oc.jpg" kann nicht angezeigt werden, weil sie Fehler enthält.

MSI R3870X2 packs 1GB of GDDR3 memory, dual DVI/TV out, HDCP, HDMI, DX 10.1 and comes in a really big box.

The card is overclocked straight out of the box, and you can overclock it even further. The reference GPU clock is 825MHz, but MSI opted for 860MHz, while the memory still runs at reference 900MHz. At first we were wondering why they left the memory as it is but after we installed MSI’s version of Catalyst drivers we got a clear answer.

Many of you are familiar with D.O.T., Dynamic Overclocking Technology tool that MSI has been using for a long time now, and it’s this tool that makes overclocking easy for inexperienced users. The picture below speaks louder than words, and as you can see, D.O.T. has 6 steps for overclocking, each named after a rank in the U.S. Navy.

Die Grafik "http://www.fudzilla.com/images/stories/2008/January/Reviews/3870X2%20MSI/3870x2_msi_normalno.jpg" kann nicht angezeigt werden, weil sie Fehler enthält.


However, overclocking MSI’s card with D.O.T. didn’t quite go as well as expected. On the second rank (Sergeant), the core ran at 878MHz, which is maximum no matter what rank we used. Captain clocks the memory to 955MHz, and the following three ranks, including Commander, don’t change a thing. This either suggests that our D.O.T. isn’t working right or that a certain someone who made this program played too much Call of Duty. Catalyst 8.2 driver will definitely boost HD 3870 X2 performance, whereas MSI should work on their D.O.T. some more. Actually, the new D.O.T. is expected after the Chinese New Year that started yesterday.

MSI R3870 X2 overclocked card runs at 860MHz, but using D.O.T. or ATI’s Overdrive you can reach maximum 878MHz GPU and 955MHz for memory. Using Catalyst Overdrive simply won’t result in more. ATI’s Auto-Tune option won’t work and it crashes the card every time it boots. We know this is one of the first drivers so we’re looking forward to some fixes.

Die Grafik "http://www.fudzilla.com/images/stories/2008/January/Reviews/3870X2%20MSI/3870x2_msi_overc.jpg" kann nicht angezeigt werden, weil sie Fehler enthält.

 

Since the card has internal CrossFire, courtesy of the PLX chip, we’ve decided to check whether it has multi-monitor support.

Image

Just like Nvidia SLI’s 3D mode, Crossfire’s 3D mode won’t let you use dual-monitor. However, after brief testing we realized that our two monitors indeed work, but with certain limitations.

Image

The easiest way to set up your monitors is using the basic mode of Catalyst driver. Since this is a CrossFire card, as soon as you go into 3D mode you lose interaction with the second monitor. That means that you can’t play on one monitor and work on the other one simultaneously. Clone and Extended options work, but it means your monitor goes blank in 3D mode. To simplify – 3D rendering in CrossFire is performed in a way where each chip renders a part of the picture or a single frame. So, whether it’s CrossFire on a single card or CrossFire (or SLI) on two cards, the problem stays the same.

Image

So far, we tested HD 3870 X2 cards with two video outs, and it’ll be interesting to test HD 3870 X2 cards with 4 outs (Asus, Power Color and some other companies also have them).

At a first glance, the Radeon HD 3870 X2 seems huge, but it’s no bigger than Ultra. Although it features two RV670 graphics processors the power consumption is acceptable. Although we hear numbers of 200W per card, our real test resulted in 377W for the whole system under a workload, whereas the same Core 2 Duo 6800 Extreme setup, but this time with Nvidia’s Ultra card, resulted in consumptiot of 359W. Thanks to PowerPlay technology, our Radeon HD 3870 X2-inside system consumed 195W in idle mode, whereas with Geforce Ultra that number was 227W.

Image


Powering the card is done with one 8-pin and one 6-pin connector, just like we saw on HD 2900 XT cards. For those who don’t have an 8-pin connector on their PSU’s, MSI ships an 8-pin-to-6-pin adapter in the box. The cooler reminded us of 2900’s cooler, but this time it’s got no heatpipe, and it’s longer since it has a difficult job of cooling two chips. Luckily, the fan was improved and now it runs quietly, except at highest workloads. MSI kept the reference cooler design, but we’ve already seen some partners incorporating their own.

Image

You can chain two HD 3870 X2 cards in CrossFire, but CrossFireX drivers aren’t ready yet.

Image

MSI ships the standard bundle (except for non-standard 6-to-8pin adapter), and it’s all packaged in a huge box. 

Image

This box was built to definitely capture your attention when in a computer store.

Image



  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »
(Page 1 of 2)
Last modified on Monday, 11 February 2008 02:42
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments